An Old Landmark Burned.

An Old Landmark Burned.

On the night of December 26 the Carmichael flouring mill, an old landmark of Rushville, Ind., was burned to the ground, in spite of the brave efforts made by the local fire department to save it. Three alarms were turned in. In the mill were stored about 8,000 bushels of wheat and 1,200 of corn, all of which was entirely consumed. A fine horse, also, was burned to death. The mill itself was valued at $8,000 and was insured for $(,oco—making the total loss close upon $14,000. This was the third time that the mill has burned, the first fire having been in 1840. A barn next to the mill was slightly damaged, but was saved by the firemen. It had an iron roof, and between the mill and the barn was the corncrib. Another small building across the street was also consul erably damaged. Some say it was the first building to catch fire and that the mill caught fire from it. The mill, which was originally built in 1840. had just been considerably improved. The Rushville firemen number twelve, and, on account of the good work they did on the occasion of the mill fire, a collection was made by the citizens which amounted to $24. rite equipment of the department is as follows: Steamers, two; chemical hand-extinguishers.; hook and ladder truck; hose wagon; hose, cotton, rubber-lined, good, 2.800 ft. The Gamewell fire-alarm system is installed, and three horses are in service. 1 he fire-area to be protected extends over 800 acres, on which are set over too hydrants, with a fire-pressure 120 lb.

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