Anniversary of the Jacksonville Conflagration

Anniversary of the Jacksonville Conflagration

Sunday, May 3, was the thirteenth anniversary of the Jacksonville, Fla., conflagration, which commenced at noon, May 3, 1910, and swept over more than 400 acres in the residential and business sections. The fire was caused by a spark from the pipe of a negro employee of a mattress factory, which ignited fibre material used in the factory and which was spread out to dry in a yard where the employees ate their lunch. Most of the buildings in the city then had shingle roofs which, on that warm day, were very dry. The fire spread rapidly to buildings and inside of half an hour after the first alarm more than half a dozen large and separate fires were raging sevral blocks from where the fire originated. A strong west wind fanned all the fires, which spread rapidly, and within a few minutes after the fire started it was beyond control and spreading in all directions except to the westward. The Chelsea, Mass., conflagration of April 12, 1908, which also started at noon, spread very much in the same manner and was largely due to shingle roofs.

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