Annual Fire Report of Mt. Vernon

Annual Fire Report of Mt. Vernon

The annual report of Chief John Gibson, of Mt. Vernon, N. Y., covering the period from October, 1919, to October 1, 1920, emphasizes three important features: first, the necessity for more fire alarm boxes in all sections of the city; second, the Oakwood Heights section of the city to have more hydrants, and third, the necessity for a new 65-foot aerial truck. According to the report, there are 434 volunteers in the department and 29 paid men. Of the volunteers, Chemical No. 1 has the largest roster, sixty men, which is a full company. The fire alarms for the year totalled 150, of which 113 were minor and the rest boxes. The principal cause for fires was the careless use of matches, 17 being the result from this cause. Short circuits caused 16 fires and spontaneous combustion, 11. The apparatus of the department at the time of the report consisted of one White city ladder truck, one Ahrens-Fox combination pumper with capacity of 800 gallons per minute, two American-La France combination pumpers with capacity of 750 gallons per minute, four combination chemical and hose cars, with one 50-gallon tank on each, one American-La France 75-foot aerial, with ladder, one Cole 7-passenger chief’s car, two Ford passenger cars for deputy chiefs, and two American-La France steam fire engines, horse-drawn, in reserve. The department had 11.020 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose in good condition and 1,050 feet of chemical hose. The total valuation of buildings in which fires occurred was reckoned at $2,260,622, and the total loss on buildings and contents was $75,097.73. According to Chief Gibson, the department during the past year was entirely motorized, “due to the efforts and progressive methods of Fire Commissioner Havey, and I wish to thank him publicly for purchasing the modern apparatus which has been added to this department in the year past and for fulfilling the recommendations made in my last report.” Besides the recommendations mentioned in the beginning of this article, Chief Gibson urges the purchase of a thawing device for frozen hydrants, as there is no such apparatus in the department at the present time.

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