Annual Hartford Fire Report

Annual Hartford Fire Report

CHIEF JOHN C. MORAN, OF HARTFORD, CONN.

Chief John C. Moran, of Hartford, Conn., in his annual report for the year ending March 31, 1914, presents the following information: “Number of alarms 576, an increase of 75 over the year previous, and the total loss much greater, $433,903.37 as compared with $197,189.22 for 1912-1913, due mostly to the burning of the Union Station on February 21, 1914, and a serious fire at the Auditorium February 26, 1914, for both of which second and third alarms were sounded. Only one other fire, June 19, 1913, on the premises of the Industrial Realty Company, Market street, required a second alarm, but on four other occasions unnecessary second alarms were sounded by citizens before apparatus could reach the scene and on three ethers two different boxes were sounded for the same fire. The department responded to eight out of town calls for assistance. There were 201 box and 375 still alarms.The total loss was $422,903.37 in propertyi insured for $5,076,827. The department consists of 14 engine, 4 truck and one squad company. A drill school was commenced April 1, 1913, and continued to June 27. It was resumed on September 15 and stopped September 30. The number of members attending was 8 probationers, 5 regulars, who had nottaken a course before and 130 other regulars. In addition, two members of Hose and Ladder Company No. 1 of South Manchester served with a class eleven days and passed through the school successfully. Company work, in competition for the commissioners’ trophy cup, was started October 4 and continued through October 22, with a general improvement noticeable. Each company reported with six men and each went through the same mahouevers. Squad A won the cup again. Iluilding inspection work, with fire prevention one of the main objects, has been carried on by members of the regular uniformed force as thoroughly as – ther department work permitted. A new form of inspection card has been adopted and while one report is turned in to the chief, the duplicate is kept on file in the company station. Bad conditions wherever found have been called to the attention of the owner or tenant and steps taken to have them remedied. By permission of the Boston department .officials Deputy Chief Dahill spent two weeks on duty in the Boston department last fall, studying that city’s fire prevention and mutual aid systems, and gathering much information of value to this department. For the better systematizing of this inspection work and for the active taking up of fire prevention work, we recommended the creation of the office of third deputy chief, this official to give his attention directly to work on these lines,” and the report says: “As this matter was endorsed by the finance board, fire deptfrtment committee and ordinance committee, and the otdinance passed by the board of councilmen, it is very regrettable that it should have failed (by one vote) in the board of Aldermen. We hope the matter will be revived and the ordinance passed, for we are confident that the creation of this office will result in a lessening of fires. This is the universal report of places which have taken up fire prevention work.” His recommendations are: Fireproof headquarters on a new site. New Central office fire alarm system with department telephone system. Replacement of stations Nos. 1, 4, 5, 6, truck 1 and headquarters. Additional truck facilities for factory district and part of the “Hill” section. Motorization of the department. Replacement of three old steam engines. Third deputy chief to supervise fire prevention work. The department is governed by a boardof six fire commissioners. The officers of the uniformed force are Chief J. B. Moran, Deputy Chiefs D. J. Dahill and M. T. Kenna. The force consists of 154 men and the salaries are: Chief of department, $2,700; first deputy chief, $2,000; second deputy chief, $1,700; master mechanic, $1,600; superintendent of fire alarm, $2,000; assistant superintendent, $1,500; captains, $1,400; lieutenants, $1,300; engineers, $1,350; first grade men, $1,200; second grade, $1,050. Each member of the department is allowed one day in ten, and ten days’ vacation without deduction of pay. The cost of department maintenance for the year was $293,499.50.

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