Annual Report of East Hartford Water Department

Annual Report of East Hartford Water Department

The annual report of Superintendent John H. Walsh of the water department of East Hartford, Conn., recently submitted to the commissioners, shows that considerable work was accomplished in spite of the high cost of labor and material, close to 9,500 feet of mains having been installed and 48 old service lines were renewed to the curb line. “We are at present having some trouble,” says the report, “from old service pipes that have been in use for 20 years or more. Where the service is not over 50 feet long, we use the pipe cleaning machine or renew the pipes inside the house. Where we have long runs of service on our main line pipes, we have had several leaks, mostly in the lead joints. Most of the leaks we had on the main highway where there is heavy truck traffic, the jarring of the ground by the trucks causing the lead joints to loosen and start the leak. With the universal joint pipe, we do not have this trouble. I have never had to fix a leak in the universal joints. The only way this pipe will cause any trouble will be a break in the pipe and this has never happened in any of our pipe lines.” The water department now owns approximately 600 acres of land, two dwelling houses, two barns, one wagon shed, one tool house, garage and store house and three gate houses. No revenue is derived from the land or buildings.

There are 391,615 feet of main lines, 59,000 feet of service pipes serving 2,016 service connections; 8,000 feet of the new pipe lines constructed during the past year were laid outside the borough limits. Several petitions for new extensions have been applied for but on account of the new supply that is under construction by the Beaver Construction company, the board decided no extensions would be made except those absolutely necessary. Some of the water pipe fittings have trebled in cost. The largest extension that has been constructed during the past year was on Laurel Park heights. This extension was 4,710 feet long, the size of the pipe used was four-inch and sixinch, the cost totaled $7,330. Thirteen service connections were made last November and at present five more houses are ready to connect to the street mains.

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