Annual Report of Lowell Water Department

Annual Report of Lowell Water Department

In the 46th annual report of the water department of Lowell. Mass., the figures for which have been collated by City Engineer Stephen Kearney, it is shown that the increase in pumpage for the year 1918 was more than four hundred million gallons over the pumpage of the previous year. This is believed to have been a record. The net pumpage for 1918 was 2,764,748,745 gallons, and the exact increase in gallons over the net pumpage of 1917 was 411,380,568 gallons. The increase for 1917 over 1917, for net pumpage, was 122,593,595 gallons. The consumption of water for 1918 was 2,753,448,760 gallons, or an increase of 388,347,679 gallons above the consumption of 1917. In 1917 the increase in consumption was 133,138,049 gallons over and above what was consumed in 1916. The maximum pumpage for one day in 1918 was that of August 5th, when it was 9,305,999 gallons. For 1917 the maximum pumpage in any one day was on August 3d, when it was 9,113,322 gallons. The maximum pumpage for a single week in 1918 was 62,287,402 gallons, and this was during the week of August 4th to 10th. The maximum weekly pumpage for 1917 was 60,311,727 gallons, and it was for the week of July 29th to August 4th. The water department estimated that the population of Lowell last year was 125,000 persons, and this figure was used to determine various per capita amounts. Of the total amount consumed last year 1,609,489,482 gallons were metered, or 58.45 per cent, of the total. The average daily consumption in 1918 was 7,544,243 gallons, and, on the basis of 125,000 population, the average daily consumption was 60.35 gallons. This figure, however, does not give a correct idea of the average daily consumption per person, for a vast amount of the water used was for manufacturing purposes, and not for home use. The cost to the city of producing each million gallons consumed, based on the total cost of maintenance of the water department, was $78.17, but, based on cost of maintenance plus interest on bonds, the cost per million gallons was $90.88. During the year mains extended totalled 4279 feet in length, making a total at the present time of 160.46 miles of water mains in use in the city. Nine hydrants were added, making a total of 1455. The range of pressure on mains varied from 27 to 82 pounds.

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