Annual Report of the Fire Department of Superior

Annual Report of the Fire Department of Superior

The annual report of the chief of fire department of Superior, Wis., shows that there were for 1917 300 alarms, of which 22 were false alarms, 4 of these from the American District Telegraph. Actual fires in buildings were one less than in 1910. Number of fires in brick and stone buildings, 19; number of fires in wooden buildings, 181; other than building fires, 63; total, 243. Number of fires confined to buildings or place of origin, 242; number of fires extending to immediately adjoining buildings, IS; number of fires confined to floor where they originated, 174. Fires extinguished by water through hose lines, 37; by chemicals, 108; by water through hose lines and chemicals, 23; by buckets of water and other means, 54; out on arrival, 21. In responding to alarms the department traveled 2,150 miles, worked at fires 1,597 hours and 42 minutes, laid 54,800 feet of hose, used 3,715 gallons of chemical fluid and raised 3,195 feet of ladders. There were five calls for the use of the lungmotor. The apparatus of the department is as follows: 2 steam fire engines, 1 triple combination motor pumping engine, 1 tractor-drawn aerial truck, 1 motor squad wagon with chemical tank, 1 four-wheel drive combination chemical and hose car, 1 chief’s auto, 1 Ford car for electrician, 1 motorcycle, 2 combination chemical and hose horse-drawn; 1 combination and hose wagon with turret nozzle, horsedrawn; 1 combination chemical and city servicetruck, horse-drawn; 1 fuel wagon with turret nozzle, horse-drawn; 1 50-gallon chemical engine, hand-drawn; 3 hose reels, hand-drawn; 2 lungmotors, 3 smoke helmets, 10 water-proof covers. A triple combination pumping engine has been ordered. The old police motor patrol is being rebuilt for a combination chemical and hose car. At the beginning of the year the department had eleven horses in service and one in reserve. It now has eight horses in service. Two horses were sold and two horses were so badly injured in falling while responding to an alarm that one had to be shot and the other was turned over to a farmer on recommendations of the city veterinary. There are 13,000 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose and 1,750 feet of chemical hose in service, all in first class condition. The department is composed of 71 full paid men, including the officers; two operators at headquarters and two companies of volunteers. There are in service 952 hydrants and 424,047 feet of water mains. 25 hydrants, 3,116 feet 6-inch, 8,454 feet 12-inch water mains were installed during the year by the Superior Water Light & Power Company. Since the adoption of the building code, all permits for new buildings, for repairs and alterations of old buildings and for the installation of heating and lighting apparatus have been issued from the chief’s office and a close supervision over building operations has been conducted by members of the department. Inspection of buildings and premises by members of the department for the purpose of preventing fires now forms an important factor in the work of the department. During the past year, two members of the department and the city electrician have been engaged in this work. Besides the verbal recommendations for changes and improvements to owners and tenants made by these inspectors while in the performance of their duties, 261 printed notices were issued from this office. As a rule, the recommendations are generally complied with, and most of the citizens of Superior are giving this work their hearty support. The department renders a double service —a fire and building department in one. It is now well organized for effective work in both branches. Structural conditions have been materially improved during the past few years and progress is rapidly being made in better building construction in all parts of the city. This work has resulted in a noticeable reduction in the number of actual fires and a genera] decrease in the fire loss. Chief Olaf Johnson of Superior is now engaged in government work, as assistant to Marshal McFall, and Ole Norman is acting chief of the department during his absence.

Second Assistant Fire Chief Clarence H. Hough of the Council Bluffs, Ia., fire department, died suddenly of uraemic poisoning Sunday morning, June 23. He had been a member of the city’s fire department for twenty-four years, having been appointed on the force in February, 1894. In August, 1904, he was promoted to a captaincy and in May, 1914, received the promotion to the position he capably fulfilled until the time of his death.

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