ANOTHER MODEL ENGINE HOUSE.

ANOTHER MODEL ENGINE HOUSE.

The plans prepared by A. P. Cutting for the new Fire Engine House on Prescott street, nearly opposite Concord street, says a Worcester, Mass., paper, provide for a main building 48 by 60 feet, with a projection on the south side 31 by 22 feet, and another at the rear 20 by 16 feet. The size ot the lot will not allow the construction of a building of uniform shape and provide the accommodations necess iry. The plan contemplates a one story building, with a hip roof with gables on the Prescott street and south sides, making in reality two full stories. The material will be brick, and the trimmings of granite. The extreme height of the building will be 36 feet, and a tower, to be provided with the necessary arrangements for a fire alarm bell and striker, will rise to a height of 68 feet on the south side. The building is intended for a Steamer, Hose Carriage and Hook and Ladder Truck, but is to be divided by a parti-wall, that each company may be independent of the other. The southern half is intended for the Hook and Ladder Truck, the Truck room being 57 1/2 by 22 feet. The stalls for the horses will be on either side of the room, the horses standing against the forward wheels of the Truck, and of course facing the door to facilitate hitching up to answer alarms. In the rear of the stall, on the inside, provision is made for a spare stall. The hay and grain will be sent down from the loft in a shoot constructed ia the parti-wall, so that it can be used by both companies. In the rear of the Truck room is the bunk room for the Hook and Ladder Men, 15 by 18 feet, to be provided with four beds. In the second story, looking north, is the Company room, 18 by 17 feet, and a sitting room, 15 by 20 feet, with four closets, and a bath room, 8 by 9 feet, connected therewith. The entrance will be on the north side for the Hook and Ladder Men, and a sliding pole will connect the Company room with the lower floor. The southern half of the building is for the Steamer and Hose carriage, its dimensions being 57 1/2 by 22 feet. The hose carriage is to stand in front with a stall so located that the horse will stand against the forward wheels. The stalls for the Steamer horses are to be located on either side of the room, the horses standing abreast the forward wheels. On the south side is the bunk room, 17 by 14 feet, and a sitting room 14 by 15 feet. There are four closets opening out of the sitting room, and the main entrance is through the tower, from which either the Engine room or Company room can be entered. On the Second floor is the Company room, 20 by 17 feet, with cot meeting closets and bath room. There is also a store room 15 by 17 feet, and an ample hay and grain loft. The Engine rooms are to be sheathed and the rooms above to be plastered.

As far as possible the plan ot the modern house in New York city, where hitches are frequently made in 2 1/2 seconds, has be n followed, but the shape and size of the lot made it necessary to locate the Engine bunk room on the side of the Engine room instead of in the rear, as in the New York house. The saving in time in making the hitch is mainly in the distance the horses have to run, which is reduced to the minimum by having the stalls abreast the wheels of the machines. The plan of having the men and horses on the same floor is thus considered by the FIREMAN’S JOURNAL : It may be thought that the arrangement for men and horses sleep ng on the same floor would make it unhealthy for the men. But such is not the case. The cellar is dug out the whole depth of the lot, and thoroughly ventilated. There is a ventilator for the Engine room, and another for the sleeping room, while both rooms are kept as clean as a parlor floor. The beds of the men are two and a half feet above the floor, which is above the carbonic gases that may be generated in the winter, and below in the summer, as these gases ascend in hot weather and descend in cold. At the height of the beds from the floor the men experience no ill effects from the atmosphere, and medical men say that the arrangement is not deleerious to health. Great care has been taken in this respect, for the health of the men is one of the first things to be considered. Plenty of fresh air is provided, and abundint ventilation, while neatness and order are peremptorily enforced.

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