ANOTHER RESERVOIR SCHEME FOR NEW YORK.

ANOTHER RESERVOIR SCHEME FOR NEW YORK.

The board of Croton aqueduct commissioners, whether out of zeal for the well-being of the citizens of New York, or influenced by a desire to prolong its existence (and, incidentally the comfortably salary of $10,000 a year attached to each commissionership) has evolved yet another scheme for adding to the water supply of New York city and has caused preliminary surveys leading up to that end to be made. The plan contemplates an enormous reservoir nearly seven miles long, with a capacity of nearly 10,000,000,000 gallons, and a smaller supplementary reservoir at Cross river, which in the opinion of Chief Engineer J. Waldo Smith of the aqueduct board, will afford the city an additional supply of 50,000,000 gallons daily. It is intended to build a masonry dam 1,000 feet long to close the mountain gorge through which flows the east branch of the Croton river at a point immediately north of De Forest Corners, in the upper Croton watershed region. At the De Forest dam there would be twenty-five feet of water. At Pauling the water would be from ten to fifteen feet deep, and over the little town of Patterson, near Pawling, with its 1,000 inhabitants, its three hotels, its churches, its school and its cigar factory would stand from seventeen to twenty feet of Croton water. Four thousand acres, nearly, if not all improved property, would have to be flooded, and to obtain these properties costly condemnation proceedings would he needed. Opposition to this plan is offered not only by the Merchants’ association, but, also, by Water Commissioner Oakley, who favors the plan of obtaining water from the Schoharie, Esopus creek, and the other sources spoken of in a previous article, or of draining the Croton swamps and turning its waters into one of the lower reservoirs already built or being built, whereby the necessity of flooding the improved property mentioned and of involving the city in costly condemnations would be avoided. Chief Engineer Smith’s plan, even he himself is forced to admit, even with the additional 50,000,000 gallons per day would not be enough for the wants of the city a few years hence, but be a help only while a more ambitious system was being built.

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