ANOTHER SUMMER HOTEL BURNED.

ANOTHER SUMMER HOTEL BURNED.

The Franconia inn, one of the oldest and bestknown of the White mountain hotels, was burned at Franconia, N. H., on November 26. The loss is estimated at $20,000, and is fully covered by insurance. The building was unoccupied, and the cause of the fire is not known. The Franconia inn, a five-story, wooden building, with rooms for 300 guests, was the first hotel to be erected in the village. The hotel burned to the ground within an hour. Nothing was saved from the building. Valuable pictures and furnishings were destroyed. The absence of wind saved the surrounding cottages. No one had been in the building for over a week, so far as is known. It is believed the fire was either set or started from spontaneous combustion. There is no water supply in Franconia in the winter time, nor has the place any fire department, and the half-dozen residents of the place could do nothing towards saving the hotel. The inn was situated on the southeasterly slope of Sugar hill, at an elevation of 1,500 feet. The New York World remarks editorially that the burning of this hotel “adds another to the long list of seaside and mountain hotel fires which have given the season an unenviable distinction. The destruction of the Long Beach hotel, the Castleton, the Cliff house and the practical wiping out of Old Orchard Beach establish new records of fire casualties of this class.”

ANOTHER SUMMER HOTEL BURNED.

1

ANOTHER SUMMER HOTEL BURNED.

On the night of September 23 the Hotel Ampersand, one of the largest and oldest summer hotels in the Adirondack mountains, was destroyed by fire. The loss, which is covered by insurance, will amount to about $270,000 on the building, furnishings and silverware. The hotel, having been closed for the season on September 16, was not occupied. The origin of the blaze, which was discovered at 6:30 p. m„ is a complete mystery. The fire started high up in a small cupola in the tower; defective wiring, or plumbers disconnecting water and gas pipes may have been to blame. The Saranac Lake fire department was aided in its efforts to extinguish the blaze by a large number of the villagers and by the campers on the lower Saranac lake, who came down the lake in their launches, though they were powerless to save the hotel, which was burned to the ground. The cottages surrounding the hotel were onlv slightly damaged. The main part of the building was built about twenty years ago, and an addition was made in 1891. It could accommodate 250 guests. The building was old and the timber dry, and the flames spread with rapidity. By the time the fire department arrived and got sufficient water the flames had spread from the main structure to the annex, the servants’ quarters, the carpenter shop, and other outbuildings, which were located from 30 to too ft. from the hotel. By hard work the fire was confined to this area, and the handsome cottages which cluster about tile hotel were saved. Within two hours aft r the firt was discovered nothing remained of the Ampersand hotel but a mass of ruins. The main building, four stories in height, was 150 fit. long. The alarm for the fire was given on the big fire bell by the wife of the bookkeeper, who discovered the flames.