ANOTHER WASHINGTON WATERPOWER.

ANOTHER WASHINGTON WATERPOWER.

A Tacoma, Wash., correspondent writes that a “waterpower electric generating plant similar to that at Snoqualmie falls is to be constructed in the Stuck river valley in the near future. Articles of incorporation have been filed at the State department, the incorporators being Charles H. Baker, T homas B. Hardin, Lester Turner, O. D. Colvin, and Colonel G. Simpson. Mr. Baker is president and chief engineer of the Snoqualmie company, and a merger is effected of the two companies, the new organisation to be known as the Snoqualmie Falls and White River Power company. The engineering plan consists in the diversion of White river at a point near Buckley, where the hcadworks will be constructed, and carrying the water through an earth canal about six miles long to lake Tapps, which lies on the brow of the hill above the Stuck river valley. The lake will serve as a storage reservoir and has a capacity for supplying 6o,ooo-horsepowcr for twenty days without any call upon the river whatsoever. From the lake the water will be carried through pipes to the waterwheels at the foot of the hill at a point not yet determined; it will, however, be within a radius of nine and one-half miles of the station of the Tacoma Cataract company in Tacoma, and twenty-five miles from Seattle.

“It is stated at the local Snoqualmie office that the development will proceed upon the basis of ultimately realising 6o,ooo-horsepower, but that machinery for 12,000-horsepower only will be installed in the generating station at the present time. The head of water over the wheels is 465 feet. There will be an entire works upon the same permanent and substantial lines as in evidence at Snoqualmie falls. The new power will tie available in Tacoma and Seattle in twelve months, and the estimated outlay is $1,500,000.

“It is understood that there will be no further extensions at Snoqualmie falls for a year or more, as it is Mr. Baker’s plan to reach Portland, Ore., with his lines, which the White river power will enable him to do with a saving of fifty miles of transmission. The Snoqualmie and White river plants will be run together,, and each will serve as a reserve for the other—the idea being for the former plant to carry the load in Whatcom and the northern cities, while the White river plant will supply Portland and the intervening cities lying to the south.”

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