ARTESIAN WATER FOR DOUGLAS.

ARTESIAN WATER FOR DOUGLAS.

A Douglas, Ariz., correspondent writes that “at the Copper Queen smelter, one mile and a half west of the city park in Douglas is an artesian flow of water of 200 gallons per minute going to waste, and has been for the last four months. The presence of this artesian water so near the city, it is thought, would justify the attempt being made to secure artesian water with in the corporate limits of Douglas. Such a well could be located in the park, and, if an artesian flow could be secured there, it would IK* one of the greatest factors imaginable in the future prosperity and growth of the city. At the San Bernardino ranch, seventeen miles southeast of Douglas, are a number of artesian wells, flowing sufficient water to irrigate several hundred acres of land. Thus there is artesian water flowing both cast and west of Douglas, which is certainly indicative of the possibility of securing an artesian flow in this city. In the past there have been several efforts made to raise funds among the ranchers in the vicinity of Douglas to put down a test well; but the project has always failed, owing to the heavy expense and the chance of failure and consequent loss of the money put into it. It is thought that the proposition of developing artesian water in this city as a demonstration of its presence anywhere in the Sulphur Springs valley, is one of the most important that could engage the attention of the citizens and people. Under the provisions of the Federal government’s Reclamation act, under certain conditions, government aid will probably be afforded. If this is not possible, then the city should arrange for a test well. The possibilities of success are certainly good enough to warrant the expenditure of the taxpayers’ money in this direction, when it is considered what success would mean to every property owner in Douglas. It would mean that Douglas would become a city of 50.000 inhabitants, and the Sulphur Springs valley would be populated bv as many more people.’’

St. Stephen, Me., will supply the town of Calais and Milltown with water furnished to the Maine Water company, with which it has a contract. T he source will be the Maxwell crossing well, from which St. Stephen will supply its own municipal needs, the price to be paid by the water company being $24 for each 1.000.000 gallons. To take on the territory added under this agreement St. Stephen will have to spend at least $30,000 more than would be necessary, were the supply needed solely fftr friiinicipal purposes; it is expected that the income to be derived from the sale of water to the Maine company will prove of benefit to local consumers, whose water rates will thus be made lower.

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