ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., WATER DEPARTMENT.

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., WATER DEPARTMENT.

According to the first annual report of the Atlantic City, N. J., water department the total cost of the water works to the city has been $865,061 85. This included the construction of the waterworks ($771,782), construction to August 1, 1896 ($89,189.35), legal expenses of transfer ($3,500), and expense of printing and advertising four and one half percent, bonds ($590). The pumping machinery at the Pleasantville station consists of one high duty Worthington pump, capacity 5,000,000 gallons per day; one compound condensing Gordon pump, capacity 3,000,000 gallons per day; one compound condensing Worthington pump, capacity 1,000,000 gallons per day; and one simple non-condensing Worthington pump, with a capacity of x,000,000 per day, making a total capacity of 10,000,000 gallons per day. The table showing the number of gallons pumped during each of the twelve months ending July 31, 1896, is specially interesting, as showing the decreased consumption of water and the reduction in the coal burned after the introduction of meters in March of this year. Before that time the number of gallons pumped varied from 203,514,701 (as in August, 1895) to I53.950,i57(asin March, 1896)—the coal consumed varying during the same period from 723,570 pounds to 263,433 pounds for the same months. In 1896 the pumpage was 118,553,249 gallons, with a coal consumption of 307.181 pounds (one engine being disabled, necessitating low duty run for eight days); in May, 123,376,149 gallons, with 268,212 pounds of coal; in J une, 124,354,784 gallons, 264,717 pounds of coal; in July, 151,174,857 gallons, 326,883 pounds of coal—the increase in each month from May onwards being due to the accession of summer visitors. The city council appropriated $25,000 for the purchase of meters, and $12,000 more must still be expended for the same purpose, in order to place practically all customers in the meter rate. On August x, 1895, there were about 350 meters in use. The department has since purchased 1,481, ranging in sizes from five-inch to three-inch. The work of setting these meters began in February, 1896, and continued up to July 15. “The results have been all that could be expected.” Before being set, every meter is tested for accuracy; the requirements being “thatno meter shall over-register, and no meter shall under-register more than two per cent.” Various makes of meters have been purchased, and a careful record is being kept of each meter—which in a few years will afford valuable statistics of the wearing qualities, accuracy, costs of repairs, etc., of each meter, and will lead to deciding upon the efficiency of the various makes. Including valves, fittings, labor, etc., it has cost on an average $15.19 per meter to buy and set 1,456, ranging in size as follows : Nine three inch meters, six, two-inch; nineteen, one and a half inch; fortyseven one-inch; 378 3-4 inch; 997 five eighth-inch. The gross revenue for the department for the year was $73,981.47; the gross expenses, including interest accounts, $83,510.39— deficit, $9,528.92, over $900of which was used out of current receipts for repairs and extraordinary expenses, while during the season 17,500,000 gallons of water are allowed for public purposes; and this, at the rate of ten cents per thousand gallons, would amount to $1,750 for street cleaning, etc., and $1,000 for school and fire department houses. For 414 hydrants, only $20 a year is reckoned—the Atlantic City Water Company ask $50 per year for each, which alone would amount to $8,280 annually. These items, therefore, make a total of $11,070, which the water department should receive from the city. Dividing the receipts for water for the year. $69,728.98 by the 1,710,892 gallons pumped during that time, a fraction less than four and one-tenth cents per 1,000 gallons was received for all the gallons of water pumped. This, the report claims, must be more than doubled to put the department on a paying basis. Reverting to the February figures, water was pumped at the daily rate of over 250 gallons per capita.; If it were not for waste, 100 gallons a day pei capita would be a liberal allowanceFiguring on an average duty of 60,000,000 foot pounds per 100 pounds of coal, there was a saving of $2.11 per day in July, 1896, compared with July of 1895, in fuel alone—an amount which will be at least doubled as the waste decreases.

A firt which started in the office of the Eureka Blaster Company, of Syracuse, N. Y., communicated to a barn in the rear and thence to the salt vats of Michael R. Hayes, destroying 4 500 barrels of salt, valued at $2,925, and causing a total loss of $25,000, on which is an insurance of $15,000. The body of Patrick Donnelly, a discharged employe of the plaster company, who was sleeping in a rear barn, was discovered after the fire burned to a crisp.

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