Attleborough, Mass., Waterworks.

Attleborough, Mass., Waterworks.

The sixteenth annual report of the water commissioners of the town of Attleboro, Mass., covers the operations of the department for the year ending December 31, 1908. Attleboro has an estimated population of 16,000, the proportion on line of pipe at date being 15,000. They consumed during the year 261,935,200 gallons of water, or 713,688 gallons per day, a very liberal alowance of 47.7 gallons for each consumer daily. The waterworks were constructed in 1873, the source of supply being a series of circular wells, near Seven Mile River, from which the water is raised by pumping into a steel reinforced concrete standpipe, 100 feet high and 50 feet in diameter, with a capacity of 1,500,000 gallons. The pumping machinery, built by the Deane Steam Pump Company and the Barr Pumping Engine Company, pumped during the year 261,935,230 gallons, on a coal consumption of 850,795 lb., giving 229 gals, pumped per pound of coal consumed, against an average dynamic head of 254 feet for the Deane and 260 feet for the Barr pumps. In the distribution service, wrought iron, cast iron and cement-lined pipes ranging from 1 to 24 inches in size, are used, the total length in use being 54.10 miles, of which 2 miles represents extensions during the period covered by the report; 2,100 services and 400 hydrants are supplied from the mains. The number of meters in use is given as 2,101, of which 1,921 are owned by the town. Of these meters 873 were supplied by the Union Water Meter Co., and by the National Meter Company, the remainder being of different brands. Several cases of leakage, attributed to electrolysis, having occurred, the water commissioners called in consultation A. A. Knudson, E.E., New York, to report on conditions existing in this respect. He made a thorough examination of the electrical conditions on the different street railway lines, offered some important suggestions as to means of preventing recurernce of the trouble and showed that danger to the water mains from this source had been largely eliminated. The report takes up, at some length, the inequality of the present system of assessing the entire cost of the supply system on water consumers, when fully one-half of its actual cost is due to provision for fire protection. Many properties that use little or no water are profiting by a protection against fire for which the water using community is paying. The commissioners suggest the payment by the town of a yearly sunt as rental, for each hydrant, which it would have to pay if a private companysupplied the water. The financial statement shows receipts for water rates for the year ending January, 1909, of $45,893, an increase as compared with last year’s receipts of upwards of $6,000, and the largest in the history of the department. The indebtedness of the town for waterworks construction is given as $537,000, or, deducting the sinking fund assets of $62,063, a net debt of $474,936. The superintendent reports 2,098 services in use, including 139 added for the year, while 16 new hydrants and 23 new gate valves were set during the year and 129 meters. Three sprinkling connections have been added, making 33 private fire connections in use. The pumping station is reported as in good condition. The board of commissioners consists of David E. Makepiece, William M. -Stone and Karl H. Hyde, with George H. Snell as superintendent and registrar.

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