AUXILIARY HIGH-PRESSURE SYSTEM FOR HARTFORD.

AUXILIARY HIGH-PRESSURE SYSTEM FOR HARTFORD.

Correspondence of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.

Hartford, Conn., contemplates the installation of an auxiliary high-pressure service for fire protection—as an aid to, not in any way to supersede the city’s excellent fire department or any of its equipment. The chief reason for this addition to the city’s fire protection being suggested is the increasing height of the buildings in the business district, where it is claimed within a little more than a generation they will reach sixteen or even more stories. As, however, that is not likely to he anything like universally the case for many years to come, there are not lacking those who suggest that it would he the better policy to increase the existing firefighting facilities. Be that as it may, the question is being seriously debated, and the matter has gone so far that City Engineer F, L. Ford and Con suiting Engineer ICrmon M Beck were contniis sioned to report upon the subject. In their re port they take as the limit of the area to be so protected t.14 sq. miles. This will need 10,12 miles of pipe 24-in. to 8 in., of which 4.32 miles should be laid immediately -sufficient, they think, to protect that portion of the business section where the most costly and the most important houses and goods are to he found. The Connecticut river (by no means a prepossessing stream) would be the source of supply, and the water would be pumped bv steam turbines or gas engines. On the 24-in. lines would be fixed 20-in. gates, with reducers on each side. The hydrants would have 8-in. barrels and 4-in. outlets. Each outlet would have a separate and independent gate. The spacing between each would IK* J50 ft. in the most dangerous section, 200 in that where the danger is less, and 300 where it is least. At the hydrants the pressure would be 300 lbs., and the hydrants themselves would be set so as to accommodate a 400-ft. length of hose in the districts where the fire-hazard is greatest; a 600 ft. length eleswhere. The cost of the pipe, hydrants, gates, etc., is set down at $195,000; of a plant using producer gas, $378,000—the annual cost of operation and maintenance to be $65,667; of a steam turbine, with turbine pump. $258,000, with operating and maintenance charge. $87,904 a year. P. T. E.

Within a week three very old and crowded water mains burst in the business district of Chicago. doing considerable damage,

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