BAD WATER AT COLON.

BAD WATER AT COLON.

In spite of all President Roosevelt’s and Secretary Taft’s denials that the water at Colon is bad. Poultney Bigelow returns to the charge and quotes the Colon Telegram to support his asser tion. That paper writes as follows: “The unwholesome water being supplied in Colon by the Isthmian Canal Commission has aroused general complaint and indignation. The water is reported to have a most disagreeable odor, anil, when uoil d, it leaves a sediment, showing it is unfit for drinking purposes. To add to the injustice being done to the inhabitants, the water-tanks have been re moved by the Sanitary Department, and no rail water can now lie caught. The very few tanks that remain in the town are being raided by the neighbors who have been compelled to take the Monkey Hill water, and the worst of it is that the Panama Government, which should take -ups to protect the inhabitants ot Colon, stands indifferent to the many complaints that have been made through the press. The fact is. the water for Colon is not from any river, lmt comes from a kind of pond made by inclosing a small valley, and. if iiltcrbeds are not provided, t le water supplied will ever be of an inferior quality, if not dangerous to public health.” Mr. Bigelow quotes another editorial article as follows: “Contrary to the rumor that was circulated round, that dead bodies hail been found at the source of the Colon water supply, an examination was made on Sunday last bv one of the sanitary inspectors, and it was found that the putrid snail arc e from an accumulation of rotten vegetable matterand of this we have no doubt, for, as we stated in Satin day’s issue, the receptacles for the Colon supply mere makeshifts-large ponds—in which accumulate all kinds of filthy matter, which, added to the mixture of rain-water collected in them, is bound to produce an offensive liquid called pure di inking water.”

CHIEF WALTER LIPS, Los Angeles, Cal.ALEX. THOMSON. MANUFACTURER Thomson Steel Collar.

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