Baltimore Fire Service

Baltimore Fire Service

Making an average speed of 14 miles an hour and throwing 7,000 gallons of water a minute from eight pipes the new fire boat Cataract showed up so well in a trial trip on April 4 that she will be accepted and placed in service as an auxiliary to the Deluge. The trial was in charge of Chief Emrich. The Cataract is equipped with four 1 1/4-mch pipes and four l 3/4-inch pipes and cost $65,000. The machinery was taken from the old Cataract. The new boat cost $65,000, is 100 feet long and has 25 feet beam and 12.6 feet depth of hold, with a mean draft of 8.65 feet. The engines are of the special fireboat type known as 18-inch square, with a stroke of 18 inches developing 800 horse-power. The boilers are of the watertube type, tested to stand a working pressure of 200 pounds to the square inch. There are two monitors and a tall and short tower, on top of which are nozzles. There are altogether 28 outlets for streams, which makes the vessel a formidable fire fighter.

Baltimore Fire Service.

0

Baltimore Fire Service.

Chief Emrich narrowly escaped a serious injury at the burning of a millinery factory in West Baltimore street at 8 P. M., April 6. While groping his way through the heavy smoke on the first floor, he slipped down an elevator shaft. His knee struck heavily against a protruding rafter, and a fireman who was nearby caught him. At the bottom of the shaft flames were roaring. Some twenty other firemen were overcome by smoke during the fire.

The number of false alarms has become so large that the department has taken steps to apprehend those who cause them. There were six within 72 hours recently. The action of the Grand Jury in dismissing the case of a man charged with sending in a false alarm greatly displeases the entire department. A reward of $50 is offered for the arrest and conviction of those who send in false alarms.

Charles F. Fay. of Engine 17. died April 5 of a complication of diseases, the result of an injury received at the big fire of 1904 when he was struck in the back by a piece of iron when the explosion occurred in the Hunt Building which caused the fire to spread and become a conflagration. He was 55 years of age and a member of the department 22 years. A widow and three children survive him.