BALTIMORE SUPPLIES WOODBERRY.

BALTIMORE SUPPLIES WOODBERRY.

a thriving industrial section of Baltimore, Md , There is the greatest need either of an independent water supply or of a proper amount of wholesome water being furnished to Woodberry, which is in the throes of an epidemic of typhoid fever. Fully 130 persons had been smitten by the disease, and were confined to their beds, some never to leave them alive, on May 23. and the deaths have been many. That this sickness and its accompanying deaths spring from impure water and from not flushing the gutters, the sewers, and the small brooks that run within a stone’s throw of the Hampden reservoir there is no doubt. Other causes are the dead ends. Water supply pipes which have been run into lanes and alleys to give supply to newly built houses, or to those the well supply of which had to be abandoned. These, many without flushing arrangements, are held to be responsible for some of the fever. It is pointed out that in the alley between St. Mary’s street and Fifth avenue is a water pipe which extends only part of the way. The houses on each side get the water from it. Three girls are down with the disease there, and they did not buy milk from the lone milkman on whose shoulders the responsibility for the 130 cases is laid by the health department. These dead ends are plentiful. One of the best-known physicians in the neighborhood says he knows of pipes that have not been flushed in two years. Indignation meetings are being generally held. The secretary of the board of water commissioners insists that the municipality is absolutely blameless so far as the Woodberry epidemic is concerned. I fe denies that there are any pathogenic germs in the water, and says there is plenty of good water in the city’s mains in Woodberry and Hampden. He adds: “There are no typhoid germs in the city water. None has ever been isolated from the city’s water supply, and I never knew of any bacteriological examination made of samples of water taken from taps in the city which indicated the existence of conditions under which the typhoid germ is supposed to exist and multiply.’’ The assistant doctor of the board of health recommends that all the wells be closed.

INTAKE PIPE. 24-INCH DIAMETER. THROUGH DAM, ST. CATHARINES.

Belton, Tex., has decided to purchase the local waterworks system.

No posts to display