Better Fire and Water Facilities.

Better Fire and Water Facilities.

This is the time of the year when the Mayor of the city addresses himself incidentally to the people, but particularly to the Board of Aldermen. Many suggestions are made regarding water, fires and sewers. Some of these ideas are worth considering, the greater part are not. Mayor Grant of New York believes that with the storage reservoirs now under construction and the proposed new one New York’s water supply in future will be abundant for all needs. The insurance companies doubtless will agree with his statement that the increase in fires has been out of proportion to the increase of population and buildings, the latter numbering 2628 at an estimated cost of $52,330,146, and to a still greater extent out of proportion to the increase in the strength of the department. At the same time the department has kept up its excellent record and the average loss by fire during the year was only one-third of that in the first year of its history. His suggestion, that in many districts i s efficiency would be enhanced if the six-inch water mains were replaced by larger ones, is one of practical value. Mayor Boody takes an equally hopeful view of Brooklyn’s future water supply, which, with the completion of the work now under way, promises to be adequate to the city’s requirements for many years, and urges earnestly the extension of the fire limits. Buildings have gone up apace in Brooklyn, the cost of the 4140 completed structures being $21,123,544, and the estimated cost of the J553 in course of construction $12,043,349. Mayor Matthews of Boston devotes less attention to these subjects than to others, but one of his recommendations is a new loan of $250,000 for the extension of the Cochituate water mains, $190,000 to be used in 1892. The Mayors of nearly every city generally recommend improvements in fire departments and water supplies.

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