Block Burned at Dalton

Block Burned at Dalton

Fire of unknown origin totally destroyed the Union block on Main street in Dalton, Mass., February 3, damaged another business block, and resulted in the partial wrecking of a double house. The estimated loss is $70,000. The fire was discovered at 3.15 A. M. by a policeman who saw smoke coming from rear windows of a meat market. He called up members of the fire department by telephone and a general alarm was given by blowing the whistle on the Crane paper mills. When the fire department in command of John Hardman arrived, the fire was sweeping through the block and was beyond control of the hose company. A call for assistance was sent to Pittsfield, and an engine company stationed at Morningside in command of Captain Daniel McDonald with a horse-drawn engine and hose wagon were sent over the road, arriving in time to render great assistance. There were four streams on the fire— two from the Pittsfield engine which saved several adjoining buildings. The headquarters of the Dalton Hose Company was in the block destroyed. Its apparatus, consisting of a horse-drawn hose and chemical wagon, and a ladder truck were saved, but all the department records were destroyed. The fire got a good start and spread rapidly. When the Pittsfield engine arrived the whole block was in flames, with the Dalton firemen making heroic efforts to save adjoining buildings. There was practically no wind and to this fact can be attributed the saving of many adjoining buildings. The Irving House, close by has a shingle roof and had sparks been blown upon this roof it would have quickly burned The block destroyed was occupied by stores on the street floor and by several families on the two upper floors. It was on x 110 feet, constructed of brick in 1887. The gravity water system had a pressure of about 100 pounds.

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