Blockaded Streets at Fires.

Blockaded Streets at Fires.

The Philadelphia Bulletin touches upon a practical topic in a. very practical way, thusly: “One of the effects produced by the fire last evening, was to block the cars on Walnut, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth streets; the stoppage on Tenth street of course stopped running on Eleventh, that on Eighth stopped running on Green, Coates and Fourth. The blockade was put down at a little after six o’clock, and was not raised until considerably after eight o’clock—just about the most inconvenient two hours for such a break in travel that could have been selected from the entire twenty-four. So serious a disturbance of the economy of the city as was this, should not be permitted ; especially when the means for preventing it are so simple and so cheap. The blockade was caused by lines of hose across the car tracks, and all that was required to enable the cars to pass was suitable provision of “ hosejumpers,” or little arches making the track continuous over the hose. Had these been provided, there need not have been a moment’s delay on either of the impeded streets, excepting Chestnut and Ninth, and even on these streets it would have been quite possible to pass the cars by the aid of a few additional policemen to restrain the crowd when the guard-ropes were let down. The addition of four “hose-jumpers” to the furniture of each hose carriage would not make any appreciable difference, by reason of added weight to be carried, to the effectiveness of the service, and would cost so little that the item of expense need not even be considered. The resulting advantage, as is sufficiently obvious, would be very great.”

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