Book Notice.

Book Notice.

“The Burning of Chelsea,” by Walter Merriam Pratt, which has just been issued by the Sampson Publishing company, of Boston, is an attractive, large octavo volume, fully illustrated. Price, $1.50. The author is a resident of the city of Chelsea and the son of a former mayor. He was a participant in all the stirring scenes of the fire, risked his life in saving persons and property, and acted as a volunteer fireman during the latter part of the day. The book is not a dry collection of facts, but is written with vigor and force, and is full of the mingled humor and pathos which accompany all great catasthropher.

At Cleveland, Ohio, on June 3, seven persons were killed, and many others were severely hurt as the result of a fire in S. S. Kregge’s five and ten-cent store on Ontario street. The fire followed an explosion of fireworks on display in the store. A woman who was at the fireworks counter said the stock was ignited by sparks from a device which was being demonstrated to her by a clerk. Fire Chief Wallace and the store manager were of the opinion that the pieces were ignited by an arc light

Book Notice.

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Book Notice.

Hydraulic Engineering: A Treatise on the Properties, Bower and Resources of Water for All Purposes, Including the Measurement of Streams; the Flow of Water in Pipes or Conduits; the Horsepower of Falling Water; Turbine and Impact Waterwheels; Wave-Motors; Centrifugal, Reciprocating, and Air-Lift Plants. By Gardner I). Hiscox, M. E. 300 Illustrations, with 36 Practical Fables, New York. The Norman VV. Henley Publishing Company, 13-’ Nassau Street,’ 1908, pp. 315Brice $4.

The title page of this hook amply explains its object—-namely, to furnish all who so desire a general yet compact treatise on hydraulic engineering. ft contains a brief technical sketch of the development of hydraulic engineering front the earliest times, a systematic and progressive statement of the mechanics of water and fluids in general, including hydrostatics or the equilibrium of fluids, hydrodynamics—the laws of liquids in motion—and hydraulics, in which the motion of water in pipes and canals is considered. The writer has made every detail perfectly clear, and whatever formulas he has employed he has given iti their simplest expression and explained them further by figured examples. By means of the information thus afforded—often objectively— the reader may be guided in the installation of machinery for domestic water-supply, or fire protection, the choice of a waterwheel for operating labor-saving machines, the construction and operation of hydraulic machines and the general design as well as the minor details of accumulation, pumps, presses and machine tools. The engineer will find it a ready reference in the construction of dams and storage-reservoirs for irrigation, city and domestic water-supply or driving waterwheels for manufacturing purposes. The illustrations arc all selfexplanatory, the complete table of contents gives at a glance the contents of each of the twenty chapters which make up the book, the index is full; the thirty-six tables are practical and useful. The hook well sustains the. author’s reputation for clearness and accuracy, and, like his other wellknown works on mechanical engineering and its various accessories, will doubtless find a place on the shelves of all libraries devoted to the subjects of which Mr. Hiscnx treats, and will he used as a textbook in the technical sides of underwriters and colleges, and not least in the trade schools of this continent and those of the English-speaking world