BOOK NOTICES.

BOOK NOTICES.

Proceedings of the Twenty-seventh Annual Convention of the American Water Works Association, Held at Toronto, Canada, June 17-21, 1907. Published by the Secretary. 1907. pp. 580. Secretary-Treasurer J. M. Diven, of Charleston, S. C., has published in book form the Proceedings of the Toronto convention of 1907. The volume is handsomely printed on good paper and bound in red cloth. It is well indexed; the illustrations are many; the papers need no commendation; and the fifty-one pages of advertisements cannot but be found useful to those interested in or concerned with waterworks supplies and literature. It goes without saying that this volume should find a place in every municipal, public and technical library, as well as in that of every waterworks man and every manufacturer of waterworks appliances and supplies.

The Chemistry of Gas Manufacture: A Practi cal Manual for the Lise of Gas Engineers, Gas Managers and Students. Ry Harold M. Royle, F. R. S., Chief Chemical Assistant at the Beck ton Gas Works. With Colored Plates and II lustrations. New York, The Norman W. Henley Publishing Company. 132 Nassau Street; London, Crosby, Lockwood & Son. ijo8. Pp. XV., 328. Price, $4.50.

The Norman W. Henley Publishing company, of New York, has brought out several manuals for the use of mechanical, gas and electrical engineers, all of which are distinguished for pains taking accuracy and fulness in details, as well as for being up to date in every particular. For gas engineers and those having the .direction of gasworks. who have higher aspirations than being routinists, this manual, on the chemistry of gas manufacture shows that no more practical guide could be desired. It, of course, presupposes a knowledge of elementary truths and processes of chemistry, on which, r.s a foundation, the author bases a concise treatise covering questions and points requiring attention in the ordinary course of the duties of working gas engineers and managers. These will be found to be of practical utility, especially in the case of such gas works as those in which the operations are not so extensive as to necessitate the employment of a separate chemical staff. It is a reliable guide and sufficiently covers the ground. I he several subjects treated are the following: Coal and its characteristics; furnace gases; products of carbonisation; materials for purification; firebrick and fire-clay; photometry and gas testing; carburcttcd water-gas. There are also three appendices, two treating of metropolis gas and miscellaneous extracts, and the third giving some useful tables. There is a very full index, and the illustrations, typography and general get-up of the book leave nothing to be desired. For the libraries of technical colleges and schools no better work than this could be recommended.

BOOK NOTICES.

BOOK NOTICES.

Self-Propelled Vehicles. A Practical Treatise on the Theory, Construction, Operation, Care and Management of all Forms of Automobiles. By James F. Homans, A. M. Sixth Edition.—Revised and Enlarged. New York: Theo. Audel & Co., 1907.

In a handsome volume of 598 pages the author of this book has issued a work which cannot fail to be of interest to all who own, operate, repair or intend to purchase automobiles. This treatise on these self-propelled vehicles, which has already gone through five editions, has been so revised and enlarged as to be virtually a new work, and, as gasoline seems to be the type of the future, the writer has devoted considerable space to its com plete discussion and given up a whole and lengthy chapter to “Gasoline Engine Management” the latter covering all forms of difficulty liable to occur under service conditions. There are upwards of 500 illustrations and diagrams, giving the essential details of construction and many important points on the successful operation of the various types of motor carriages driven by steam, gasoline and electricity. With this guide to direct them all who arc interested in automobiles need be at no loss for whatever information they desire on the subject. It is a perfect vade-mecum.

Quasi-Public Corporation Accounting and Management. By John F. J. Mulball, P. A. First Edition. Corporation Publishing company, P. O. Box 2428, Boston.

By means of this book the author hopes to meet the necessities arising from that evolution of business in corporate form, which has necessitated a corresponding change in the methods of accounting and managementespecially so for the quasi public corporation, whose principal and auxiliary books arc radically different from those of the ordinary business corporation. The work will be found particularly useful by the managers of waterworks systems—municipal or private—as the author has devoted nearly forty pages to what he (with Mr. William Wheeler) considers the methods necessary for the proper organisation and management of the business and the recording of all the essential details of revenue, operation, maintenance and construction, with the least possible expenditure of time and labor consistent with good management and explicit statements as to profit and loss and assets and liabilities.