Brandon is Going Ahead.

Brandon is Going Ahead.

NEW FIRE HEADQUARTERS AT BRANDON, MANITOBA.

The fire department at Brandon, Manitoba. Canada, is soon to take possession of a new central fire station. For many years the fire department occupied a building on the corner of Seventh street and Princess avenue, which in 1882 was used as city hall, police station and fire station. During the ensuing years, and after the completion of the city hall and court house, the fire department remained with the old building, on its original site. Much credit is due to the members of the city council, whose energetic efforts in representing the need of a new and modern building for the fire department, secured the ready approbation of the citizens in general, with the result that the old building is now replaced with a magnificent structure, one of which the city may well be proud of. It was erected at the cost of $40,000. It is a handsome edifice of reinforced concrete and red brick, and has been fitted up in the most modern and approved style. It is large and commodious and will accommodate six or eight pieces of apparatus, 12 horses and 25 men. The internal fittings are elaborate and well finished to every degree of comfort. It is a three-story building, the second floor being used mostly for bedrooms, offices, sitting room, bath room and lavatories, whilst the upper stor contains, apart from the alarm and battery room, spare bedrooms, an elaborate gymnasium. There is a full sized basement, containing store rooms, reserve boiler and workshops. The size of the building is 93 x 60 feet. The development of the fire department is quite in keeping with the rapid growth of the city. Brandon is, to-day, the largest city in Manitoba, outside of Winnipeg, and has splendid transportation facilities. As a railway center it is unsurpassed, having no less than four transcontinental lines entering the citv, viz.: C. P. R., C. N. R„ the G. N. R. and G.’ T. R. in addition to 14 branch lines from all business points. The city enjoys all the conveniences of sewerage, water and electric light, and the construction of a street railway is well under way. In 1900 the population was only 5,000, while today it is well up to 15,000. Building permits issued in 1910 amounted to $932,385, while during the first eight months of the current year permits for $964,259 have already been granted. The waterworks system of direct pumping, takes its supply from the river, all water being filtered mechanically before passing into the city mains. All piping is duplicated, as a safeguard against breakage during a fire; the pressure available for fire service being maintained at 140 pounds. Chief J. M. Melhuish, who has been connected with the fire department since 1888, joined as a volunteer, gradually progressed until he was appointed chief at Saskatoon. In 1909, when the fire department at Brandon was reorganized and made a permanent brigade, he accepted his present position as chief. He is an officer of much ability as a fire fighter, and is very popular with his men and the general public. He is greatly pleased with the new headquarters, and is anxious to have the men in the new building as soon as possible. More improvements are expected at an early date, and the matter of motorizing the department is already under consideration.

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