BRIDGETON IMPROVES ITS WATERWORKS.

BRIDGETON IMPROVES ITS WATERWORKS.

Bridgeton, N. J., not to be behind the times, begins the new century by ordering a new high-duty, Snow pumping engine of 5,000,000 gallons daily capacity,and when this has been installed, the 100-foot steel tank will probably have the brick wall lined with steel and the wells deepened. The system came in last year for a large amount of the expense on main pipe, fire hydrants, valves, and service pipe caused by the street improvements in the business part of the city—i.e., pavements, sewers, etc. A large number of the service pipes in the district to be paved were rusted out and needed renewing. The consumer was at the expense of replacing pipe; the digging and refilling was at the expense of the waterworks. Sixteen old fire hydrants were replaced by new ones of improved pattern, with six-inch bottom connections. The old fourinch line in Jefferson street was taken up and replaced by a six-inch line, with the necessary valves. Through the settling down of a tug at low tide, the sixteen-inch river crossing at Broad street was broken off. As it had given more or less trouble for the last twenty years, the council decided to remove the old pipe and replace it with a new one put at the depth required by the United States engineers, which is eight feet of water above the pipe at low tide. The pipe was renewed with ball-joint pipe, one-third heavier than the old plain joint, and is now in its place, with the required eight feet of water over it in both channels at low tide. This was done at an expense of about $2,000. The receipts for 1900 amounted to $23,317 50, of which $23,096.62 were for water rents. The superintendent of the waterworks is Timothy Woodruff.

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