Brief History of Waterworks at Marion, O.

Brief History of Waterworks at Marion, O.

Owing to the fact that the water main of the Marion, O., Water Company, which leads from the pumping station to the city, was broken on July 21, 1011, while the Little Scioto river was being made deeper and wider, it was believed by Health Officer Addison Bain that their was a possibility of polluted water getting into the main which might endanger the general health of the community. With this idea in view he requested :m investigation by the state board of health. On June 28, L. H. Van Buskirk, a chemical engineer, visited the city and collected samples of the water from different points in the water mains. The analytical results of the sample collected along the distribution system indicated that the present public water supply of Marion to be of satisfactory quality at the present time, for drinking purposes. The chem ical results, however, indicated a water of excessive hardness, which would prove very unsatisfactory. unless treated, for use in boilers and for the laundry. The iron quality was also high at that time Health Officer Bain recently received a complete report of the investigation of Mr. Van Buskirk, who gathered statistics con corning the Marion W ater Company, for the use of the state board of health from C. O. Prolist,

secretary. Some of the facts as given out by the water company are interesting and not generally known. The following is the report in part; “A waterworks system was first installed at Marion by the Scioto Waterworks Company in 1889 and 1890 At this time the small impounding reservoir was constructed northwest of the present pumping station, ami the supply delivered through the station through a small canal. The plant was completed and placed in operation June 12, 1890. This company continued to supply water to the city until 1894, at which time the financial conditions were such that a receiver was appointed. In 18115, by order of the court, the waterworks was sold to the Marion City Water Company. At this time the property was appraised at $145,000. The Marion City Water Company continued to operate until July 15, 1907, when the property was sold to the Marion Water Company, in 1907, the property had a valuation of $230,000. Since 1907, the present company has expended about $30,000 in improvements. The existing 25 year franchise expires June 12, 1015. As mentioned above, the water supply was first obtained from a small impounding reservoir. This reservon was continued in use until 1904, when seven 6-inch wells drilled 104 feet deep, were installed. Later, 1906, three additional wells were drilled, making a total of ten 6-inch wells, 101 feet deep. These wells are located upon waterworks property, only a short distance north of the pumping station. The wells are protected by concrete cisterns into which the water is discharged by means of air lift, from which the supply is pumped into the distribution system. Metal caps are placed over the air lift discharge pipes, against which the water is forced, giving a chance for aeration. A 16-inch main conduit leads from the pumping station to the city. The following is the length of the mains at the present time: 4-inch, 18,573 feet; 6-inch, 101,500 feet: 8-inch, 31,198 feet; 10-inch, 3,073 feet; 12-inch, 1,838 feet; 14-inch, 868 feet; 16-inch, 17,408 feet; total, 171,818 feet, or 33.1 miles. Along the mains are 403 hydrants and 2,219 services, of which 1,799 are in use; 1,600 of the services are metered. The pumping station is 65 feet below the city datum. The supply, although pumped directly to the mains, is allowed to pass an elevated tank, located on a hill in the southern part of the city. The tank is 25 feet in diameter and 90 feet high, with a capacity of 330,480 gallons, placed upon a masonry tower 20 feet high. This gives a pressure in the business section of 15 pounds per square inch. At times of fire, the pressure is increased by means of direct pumping, to 80 pounds per square inch. It is claimed by Superintendent P. Kelly that the mains are in excellent condition at the present time. The pumping station is a brick structure located on the west bank of the Little Scioto river. A house is provided for the engineer who has charge of the pumping station. A track has been provided for the delivery of coal. Three Fairbanks boilers, each of a nominal 100-horsepower, furnish steam for two Deane Pumps. each with a nominal capacity of 1,500,000 gallons per day. It is thought necessary to use only one of these pumps at a time, the other always being kept in reserve. A Laidlow-Dunn-Dordon air compressor is used for the air lift pumps. At the present time, 2.50,000 gallons of water are consumed each day.”

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