Brockton Fire Equipment.

Brockton Fire Equipment.

Brockton, Mass., has some of the largest manufactories in the state. Its population is 56.880, according to the present census, being an increase of 30 per cent, over the figures of 1900. During that time some improvements have been made in the equipment of the department, but may be possible that a serious fire might tax all of its present apparatus to the fullest extent, with very unsatisfactory results. Compared with Pawtucket, R. I., referred to in last week’s issue, city of the same size, it makes a showing of 100 per cent, in favor of Brockton. The present equipment is: Four steamers, two gasoline engines, one hand engine, three chemical engines, four hook and ladder trucks, two aerial trucks, six hose wagons, one hose cart, six supply wagons, one auto chemical wagon, one chief’s automobile, a portable water tower and two Eastman deluge sets. A complement of 14,000 feet of good hose is generally kept on hand, and the apparatus employs 40 horses. In the six fire stations, nine companies are maintained, with total membership of 89. Of these 60 are full paid and 29 are part-time men. The companies consist of six to 11 men each. The value of the equipment is $06,100: fire alarm, $39,700, and buildings, $72,350. The total expense of the department last year was $89,700, or 1.577 cents per capita of population. The total lire loss for the past three years was $253,466, and the amount of property involved, $11,801,683, an average of $84,489. Considering the nature of the property and the equipment of the department, this must be considered a remarkably good showing. The fire alarm is a modern Gamewell system, with 120 street boxes. The fire service is controlled by a council committee of five members, the present chairman being Lucius R. Churchill. For many years Harry L. Marston has been chief engineer of the department and superintendent of fire alarm. He is a thoroughly qualified officer, and an intelligent and scientific student of fire protection and extinguishment. To these facts may be attributed the small annual fire loss of the city. His first assistant is William F. Daley; second assistant, Fred H. Moore, and foreman of repair shop, Rufus May. given herewith were made from photographs given by Chief Marston to this journal. It is seldom the exact position of horses in full gallop has been procured, so that the two teams of Brockton shown may be considered the most natural and best pictures of actual work ever presented. A recent portrait of Chief Marston accompanies this notice.

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