Brooklyn Department.

Brooklyn Department.

BROOKLYN ENGINE COMPANY NO. XI.

At No. 154 Clymer street, in the Eastern District of the city of Brooklyn, in a neat brownstone front house, formerly occupied by old Victory Engine No. 13, is located Brooklyn Engine Company No. 11. On the first floor of this model house is an Amoskeag Engine of the second-class, built about six years ago and in good condition at the present time, although it has done some hard service. There is also a four-wheel Tender, built some five years ago, which looks very well notwithstanding the accident that happened to it while proceeding to an alarm of fire a short time since. There are also four stalls on this floor and four spirited horses—two for the Engine, one for the Tender, and one for Engineer George A. Frost, who makes this house his quarters. In the rear of the house is a coal depot, also a coal wagon which is used for fires in this vicinity. The lower part of the house is 90 feet deep, and the upper part about 60 feet. On the second floor is a nice sitting-room, with plenty of fine engravings and pictures, but no carpet. The window-shades are also in a very bad condition, but the boys are living in hopes that the Commissioners will give them a new carpet and shades before long. There is also on this floor a sleeping-room with 11 teds in it and a bathroom, which is a very desirable thing in an Engine-house.

As we said before, District Engineer George A. Frost has his quarters in this house. He has great confidence in Engine No. 11. He was an Engineer in the old Department for a number of years, and at one time Foreman of this Company. He is a quiet, unassuming gentleman, and is held in the highest esteem by the members of the Department and the citizens generally of the Eastern District.

The Foreman of the Company is Mr. James Maguire. He is an old veteran, having been Foreman of Engine No. 4, of the old Department, fora number of years. He was appointed about six years ago to Engine No. 15, and shortly after promoted to be Foreman of Hook and Lader No. 6, and transferred two years ago to No. 11. He is a quick Fireman and a general favorite with all the boys. The Engineer of the Company is Alfred E Grundman, another old vamp. He has been in the business over twenty years, eleven in old Victory No. 13, and over nine in Engine No. 11. He is a practical machinist and thoroughly understands his duty. The Driver, Wiliiam O’Brien, is an old Fireman. He was appointed a member of Engine No. 13 at the organization of the present Department, and in 1872 promoted to be Driver ot Engine No. 11. He is a thorough horseman, and no team looks better than his. The Stoker, Isaac C. Guischard lays claim to be an old Fireman also. He used to run with old Rooster No. 1, fifteen years ago. In 1872 be was appointed to Engine No. 11. He acts as Engineer in the absence of Grundman, who is detailed in the repair-yard. Andrew Troy is Tender Driver; he was appointed in 1870, is a careful Driver and good Fireman. Daniel R. Ketchem has run to fires over twenty years, and is one of the original members of No. 11. John A. Keveny is an old Victory man, and was appointed about nine years ago to Engine No. n. Joseph J. McCormick first ran to fires wi’h Protection Engine No. 2, and was appointed Fireman in 1871 to No. 12, but shortly after was transferred to No. ir. Michael J. McGinn was appointed in 1378, and is a competent Fireman, as is also Thomas J. Flaherty, who was appointed about a year ago. These men contribute to make No. ix one of the most efficient Companies in Brooklyn. They get their fair share of work to do, and they do it cheerfully.

Previous articleResolutions of Respect.
Next articleRandom Sparks.

Brooklyn Department,

0

Brooklyn Department,

The Pacific Feed Mills, on Columbia street between Amity and Pacific, were destroyed by fire Wednesday night. The mill is a large three-story brick building, running back two-hundred feet toward the river, and having a frontage of 180 feet on Columbia street. On the Pacific street side there are four tenement-houses, and on the same side, but nearer to the river, was an elevator 180 feet high. Fronting on Columbia street, on the West side of the building, are three tenement-houses. The fire was discovered on the third floor, and an effort was made by some of the workmen to extinguish it. The flames gathered force sd rapidly, however, that the attempt to reach the third floor was abandoned until the arrival of the Firemen. The safe, with all the books and papers of the firm, was removed from the office on the first floor. It soon became apparent that the building could not be saved, and the Firemen turned their attention to preventing the spread of the flames. The frightened inmates of the tenement-houses adjoining the mill ran into the street, taking the most valuable of their possessions. For two hours the fire burned with great brilliancy, illuminating the river and bay for miles. An object of special beauty, which attracted the attention of thousands, both in New York and Brooklyn, was the giant elevator at the river side of the building about which the flames curled and leaped fantastically, making a column of fire 180 feet high, which could be seen tor miles. Soon after 8 o’clock the West, or river side wall fell out with a crash, bringing down a burning mass ot beams and flooring. A number of Firemen working on that side of the building had a narrow escape from the falling walls. The loss on the building, the front and side w alls of which remain standing, jis estimated at about $30,000, and the loss on the machinery at between $.40,000 and $50,000. In the building there were about 100,000 bushels of corn and oats, unground, and about 5,000 bushels ground. The stock was entirely destroyed, and the loss is estimated at $70,000.