Buffalo, N. Y., Fire Report

Buffalo, N. Y., Fire Report

There were 2,040 alarms in Buffalo, N. Y., during the year ending June 30, 1913, according to the annual report of the fire department issued by Chief B. J. McConnell. The total loss was $919,563.22, of which amount $462,682.26 was on buildings, and $556,880.96 on contents. The insurance on buildings was $6,903,389.72 on contents, $3,371,621.80, making a total of $10,274,911.52. The largest losses at a single fire was $384,744.80 at one and $165,497.98 at another. There were 118 false alarms. The total loss exceeded that of 1912 by $201,494.24, but with only three exceptions it was the smallest in fourteen years. The number of alarms was the largest of any year in the department’s history. The largest annual loss in any year was $1,693,427.16 in 1887-8, when there were many large factory and other fires. The department consists of 637 men including officers and all employees. The department officers are B. J. McConville, chief of department; E. P. Murphy, assistant chief; C. T. McCarthy, J. B. Armstrong, C. F. Beasancon, Frank Eimiller, Jqhn P. Morrissey, Geo. Hcdden, T. J. Murphy and Isaac S. Dili, battalion chiefs. John G. Kraetz is chief fire alarm operator, A. L. Keller, master mechanic, and A. E. Campbell, superintendent of horses. John Weiss is department secretary. The force is divided into 34 engine companies, three of them fire boats, six chemical and eleven ladder companies. The apparatus consists of 34 steam fire engines, three fire boats, one motor engine, 31 hose wagons, six hose-chemical wagons, seven chemical engines, one motor chemical engine, thirteen ladder trucks and two water towers. The department has 90,000 feet of 2 1/2-inch and 14,000 feet of 3 1/2-inch hose. The total value of the apparatus and equipment is $874,640.00. The cost of maintenance was $1,115,125.74, the full amount of the appropriation. The salaries totaled $845,348.96.

B. J. MCCONNELL, BUFFALO, N. Y.

Railroads caused nearly half the forest fires in Colorado and Wyoming last year, and almost one-sixth were set by lightning. In California lightning started more than half, with railroads a comparatively insignificant cause.

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