Buffalo Steam Pump Company.

Buffalo Steam Pump Company.

The very complete exhibit of the Buffalo Steam Pump Company, Buffalo, N. Y,, consisted of their regular line of steam pumps, independent condensers, etc., with which we have from time to time made our readers acquainted. Though not getting in their work in an apparent effort to fill the big tank, they had a tank of their own, and in their space an exhibit that was bound to get attention. This is in the shape of a hydraulic ram of unusual proportions, getting rid, in one way and another, of a large volume of water, and capable, it is said, of raising 95,000 gallons in twenty-four hours. This was sure to attract attention, because it is out of the common, and makes some noise. There was also shown one of the smallest rams ever seen. The man in charge of this exhibit expresses himself as discouraged at the current ignorance in relation to this inexpensive and comparatively old way of raising water, and thought seriously of printing on suitable cards for distribution an answer to the question, “ What makes the thing go?”

Buffalo Steam Pump Company.

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Buffalo Steam Pump Company.

Henry A. Boyd is a native of Portland, Me., went to Boston at an early age and there obtained a thorough education. For the past sixteen years he has had a wide experience in mechanical engineering. In January, 1892, was engaged as superintendent of the Buffalo Steam Pump Company at Buffalo, and was soon after elected vice-president of the company. Under his administration many improvements have been made and several new lines of pumps which embody many new features have been brought out as well as the single cylinder condenser. New machine shops and foundry have been erected in which are found the best practice in modern improvements and many original ideas as to arrangements and methods, thus increasing the production and improving the quality of the output.

CONVENTION NOTES.

The local authorities must be congratulated upon the excellent programme of amusements provided for the visitors. Invitations to the theatres, carriage rides, a visit to the E. I’. Allis Co.’s works and I’abst’s brewery and winding up with a trip to Whitefish bay, where a banquet was spread, comprised, in part, some of the entertainment. It is needless to say, Chief Foley was the schemer of these pleasures, and that he succeeded in making all of his guests happy goes without saying.

The party that accompanied the representative of FIRE AND WATER to the convention were treated to a very enjoyable trip. The Lehigh Valley Railroad conveyed it over the mountains to Niagara Falls, where a portion of Sunday was spent. The scenery along the route was greatly appreciated, especially that at Mauch Chunk and the valley in which Wilkesbarre lies. At the Falls the party drove to all the principal points of interest on both sides of the river, and as the day was perfect for sightseeing everybody was delighted with the scenery. At Detroit Chief Battle met the party on the cars, and escorted it to the Russell House, where Commissioner Goodfellow awaited its arrival, and arrangements were made for a trip in carriages the following day. All the officers of the fire departments joined in this excursion, which included a visit to the new engine house and fire department headquarters, a trip to Belle Isle, where a collation was prepared at the principal club house on the river and a ride back to the city on the fire boat Detroiter. At the wharf, before starting, an exhibition of the boat’s water throwing was given, after which the party returned to the city and embarked on parlor cars for Grand Haven, thence across the lake to Milwaukee. FIRE AND WATER feels under many obligations to Chief Battle, the fire commissioners and officers of the Detroit Fire Department for the kind attention paid to the visitors.

The special souvenir edition of FIRF. AND WATER was greatly admired, and of the large number of copies distributed at the convention not one could be had before it closed. The delegates had tucked them away in their grips or mailed them to friends, no doubt, feeling proud that ihe association had such a worthy exponent of their views and a liberal caterer to their interests.