Buildings at Moncton Destroyed

Buildings at Moncton Destroyed

Fire Station No. 1, a livery stable, a curling rink, carriage factory and a railway storehouse in Moncton, N. B., were destroyed by a fire September 7, supposed to have been of incendiary origin. All the buildings were of frame construction excepting the fire station, which was built of brick. The fife apparatus was removed from the station unharmed. A woman discovered the blaze at about noon, in the rear of the livery stable loft, and she immediately sent in an alarm. The firemen, in charge of Deputy Chief J. C. Gunn, arrived promptly to find the flames shooting through the roof of the stable. The wooden buildings and their inflammable contents enabled the flames to make quick headway and the intense heat hindered the eighty firemen and twenty salvage corps men called to the scene. After eight hours hard work the blaze was completely extinguished. In service at the fire were a Waterous 800-gallon motor pumping engine, which, according to Chief George Acktnan, “does grand work at all times,” an Amoskeag 400-gallon steamer, a Ronald 500-gallon steamer, and about 4,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose. Eight engine and one hydrant streams were thrown from two 4-inch and four 6-inch double hydrants from 400 to 500 feet apart. A 12-inch, 6-inch and 4-inch mains supplied plenty of water, the pressure being 60 pounds at the hydrants. The total loss was about $50,000, evenly divided on buildings and contents. Assistance was asked of Amherst, N. S., and St. John, N. B., but as a heavy wind which was scattering sparks suddenly subsided their help was not needed.

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