BURST MAIN FLOODS SUBWAY.

BURST MAIN FLOODS SUBWAY.

During the thunderstorm that passed over New York city on the evening of August 7, the surface water from the raifall joined forces with a broken water main and flooded the Subway below Fourteenth street, leaving the tracks three feet tinder water in places and completely tying up downtown traffic for the rest of the night and till well on in the next morning. The flooding of the tracks and the breaking of the rainstorm were almost simultaneous. For several weeks laborers have been working at Franklin and Lafayette streets, cutting an opening for ventilating the Subway. Several water mains, leading from the Central Park reservoir, had been moved. Among them was a 36-in. main, which was shifted about to ft. While it was out of place the water was supposed to be cut off. Degnon & Co., the contractors in charge of the ventilating work, had been notified that the ripe had been isolated and could be shifted. Just before the storm broke the supposedly “dead” pipe had been cut through. Preparations for the removal of the water remaining in the pipe had been made by putting a small nump in position. The drainage, however, from five streets poured into the Subway and a sewer hacked its waters up. When the storm was at its height the water main itself burst and the water splashed through into the Subway. In a short time the third rail was covered, and this had the effect of shutting off all power between Fourteenth street and South Ferry. The water became three feet deep in spots, and the small pump was entirely inadequate to rope with the overflow. It was not very long before even that went out of commission.

A 600,000-gallon tank is being built on Lowell avenue, Portland. Ore., and service mains are being laid; cost, $4,500.

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