Call for One Fireman.

Call for One Fireman.

When fire was discovered in the household of the Misses Anna and Louise Sands, at II East Eighty-fourth street the other afternoon, the butler, tiptoeing up the waxed stairs, approached the library and tapped on the door and calmly announced the fact. Miss Anna Sands takes delight in the fine orderliness of her house. It is a handsome vhitestone front, trim without and within. The floors arc polished highly, the furniture beautifully kept, and the wainscoting has the finish which is the pride and joy ot folks who like soft tones in fine woods. The smoke was curlycuing from the cherished wainscoting. Miss Sands made up her mind in a moment that there should be no rush of hclmctcd firemen through her portals, no dragging of sputtering hose there. She called up fire headquarters on the telephone and politely requested the early appearance of one fireman. Truck 37 was the nearestt abode of firefighters, and thence headquarters dispatched Fireman Reilly. Reilly ran all the way, and tried to yank open the front door. It did not give to his mighty jerks, so He pressed the button, and the butler arrived. “Where’s it?” demanded Reilly, trying to crowd into the house. The butler, looking his scorn, went to his mistress to announce the arrival. “Show him in,” said Miss Sands. Fireman Reilly entered, wiping his feet, by request. He slid over on the polished floor; hut there was the smell of smoke, and he determined to die a hero, if necessary. Snuffing the air he tiptoed about the place, following the smoke trail until he found the real hot spot. It was between the wall and the fine wainscoting on the second floor, close to a big open fireplace. The wind had blown the smoke below, and would have led any other than an experienced firefighter wrong in his search. 1 here were many mirrors in the room. Fireman Reilly, following the instincts of his kind, would have ripped them down from the walls to reach the flames: hut the butler held him back. In desperation he jumped for the telephone and called for his company. It clattered up to the rescue. Some of theprecious wainscoting was ripped away and the fire put out. About $300 damage was done. “It was a cut-glass affair.” said Reilly when he got back to quarters. “We put it out with tumblers of water.”

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