Cambridge Fire Report

Cambridge Fire Report

Chief N. W. Bunker, of Cambridge, Mass., in the first report of the fire department since the Department of Public Safety was established on July 10, 1912, to March 31, 1913. submits the following information: The fire and police departments of Cambridge were consolidated under the Department of Public Safety, July 10, 1912, and H. J. Cunningham was appointed public safety commissioner. Chief Bunker was continued in charge of the fire division. During the eight months, or until the close of the fiscal year, there were 442 bell and 282 still alarms, a total of 721 : total loss, $301,510; value of property at risk, $2,943,928; loss on buildings, $150,743.94; on contents, $213,796.11; property insured, $1,728,554; insurance paid, $336,759.05.

The department consists of seven engines, two chemical and four ladder companies, located in 11 stations and manned by 133 men, 28 of whom are call men. The apparatus consists of seven steam fire engines, seven hose wagons, two chemical engines, two chemical hose wagons and four ladder trucks, one being an aerial. A number of pieces of apparatus are held in reserve. All apparatus is horse drawn. The cost of maintenance during this period was $153,950.27. The salaries of chief is $2,250; deputy chief, $1,750; captains, $1,350, and lieutenants $1,300 per annum. The recommendations are a new station for Engine and Truck 1; that the apparatus of the new station for Engine 5, now in process of construction, lie motorized, and other motor apparatus be procured. The Metropolitan Fire Hazard Commission of last year, composed wholly of Bostonians, none of whose members was a fireman or lire service expert, and whose recommendations were turned down by the legislature, in its report said that Cambridge depended too much on the aid that has always been r.eadily obtained from Boston. Chief Bunker, in his report, says of that statement: “It may give the idea to some timid citizens that this department w as of no use. 1 w ish it to be known that we do not depend on aid from Boston any more than Boston and other cities depend on aid from us. 1 think that the records will show that we have been called to Boston more times than Boston has been called to aid us.”

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