Captain of St. Paul Fire Department Killed

Captain of St. Paul Fire Department Killed

A recent fire in St. Paul, Minn., which caused the death of Capt. Louis Keiger, of Engine Company No. 9, occurred in the Hirsch Bros, dry goods store, in the downtown retail district. The five-story building, twentyfive years old, was of brick and wood construction and occupied a space 75 by 125 feet, on a 60-foot street. The fire started about 12.08 A. M. from unknown cause and an alarm was telephoned by a passer-by who saw the flames through the fourth-floor windows. When the first apparatus arrived, under command of Chief Henry Devlin, the fourth and fifth floors were all ablaze and burning fiercely. Secretary Peter A. Boyer, reports Chief Devlin, bent every energy to preventing the flames from spreading to adjoining buildings, and the department’s extremely good work was successful in stopping the fire on the fifth floor after it had burnt through the roof in places. The 112 firemen engaged utilized four steam engines, tractor-drawn, of Continental, Ahrens, Nott and Waterous makes; five horse-drawn steamers, including one Continental, two Metropolitan, and Amoskeag and an Ahrens, one American-LaFrance motor combination engine, one horse-drawn Waterous, one 65-foot Seagrave water tower, motor-driven, three American-LaFrance aerial ladders and one Seagrave. Fifteen streams in all were thrown, fourteen at one time, six lines working watertower from engines also. These supplied main pipe and turret nozzle. An adequate number of 6inch double hydrants were available at distances varying from 60 to 300 feet apart, with a pressure of 50 pounds. The street water main was 16-inch size. Both rubber and cotton hose were laid, 10,350 feet in all, using 1 1/8 and 1 1/4 nozzles. Six sections of rubber and two of the cotton hose burst during the fire, which was extinguished after two hours of vigorous work. The gravity water system furnished good pressure. The property was valued at $120,000 and the contents at $128,500. and the fact that the loss on the former was only $15,000 and on the latter $40,000 bears witness to the efficiency of Chief Devlin’s department.

Chief Henry Devlin, St. Paul, Minn

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