Car Shop Fire at Fitchburg

Car Shop Fire at Fitchburg

The large car shops of the Boston and Maine railroad at Fitchburg, Mass., were recently destroyed by fire with an estimated loss of $45,000, of which amount $30,000 was on contents. The total value of the property was $105,000. The fire, which was caused bv spontaneous combustion, started in the paint shop and was discovered by someone passing on the street who sent a box alarm at 5:50 p. m. The building was 125×500 feet, one story high and constructed of brick, with gravel roof and cement floor, two years ago. It had fire walls. The fire was stopped at the fire walls. There were 300 men employed in the plant, but no one was in the building at the time of the fire. There was a hose reel with 800 feet of hose on the premises. When the fire department, in command of Chief T. F. Murnane, arrived, the entire building was in flames, which were fed by paints, oil and varnish. Two hose wagons, one combination auto, one truck, and the Flying Squadron were in service. Water was taken from five 6-inch single hydrants located 150 feet apart on a 6-inch water main, supplied by a gravity system with 115 pounds pressure. In all eight streams through l 1/8-inch nozzles and 2.350 feet of rubber lined cotton hose were in use. Three lentgths of hose burned during the fire.

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