Carbolized Hose.

Carbolized Hose.

In view of the controversy which has been going on, in Philadelphia, over the contract for 5,000 feet of hose, it is well to print the terms of the advertisement inviting proposals, which required the hose “to be made of Sea Island cotton duck, twenty-two ounces to the yard, and treated with carbolic acid and frictioned, with core and covering of pure Para rubber, and to stand the pressure of four hundred pounds to the square inch. No bid entertained except from manufacturing companies direct. Samples to accompany bids. Parties furnishing the hose to guarantee its durability for two years, replace all hose that may burst with new sections, if required by the board, and give a bond, with two sureties (residents of this city) for the faithful performance of contract.” Nine proposals were presented, the highest of which was $1.15 per foot, and the lowest 69 cents, but the contract was awarded to the New York Belting and Packing Company, and the Gutta Percha and Rubber Manufacturing Company at $1.15 per foot. The testimony of the officers of the Fire Department was to the effect that the carbolized hose was the most serviceable they had used, and the Commissioners were sustained in awarding the contract, for that quality of hose. The agent of the Hamilton Rubber Works, of Trenton, N. J., claimed that he could furnish the same quality of hose for 97 cents, but it was shown that the New York Belting and Packing Company owned the patent for the carbolizing process, and that the city would be liable for damages if the proposal of the Hamilton Company’s Agent was accepted. As he refused to indemnify the city against prosecution, his offer was rejected. We refer to this subject again for the purpose of letting it be known that the manufacture of carbo— ized hose is covered by a patent, and that no one but the patentees, or their agents, have a right to contract for supplying it.

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