Celluloid Film Causes Fire in New Rochelle

Celluloid Film Causes Fire in New Rochelle

Chief Engineer James Ross, of New Rochelle, N. Y.

Fire which started in a building, one story high, and of brick construction, occupied by the Corcar Chemical Company in New Rochelle, N. Y., spread to seven buildings and did about $30,000 damage to buildings and contents. The fire is supposed to have been caused by a chip of celluloid film getting in the hot air furnace through a hot air register, causing an explosion. The manager, C. N. Van Ranst, discovered the fire, at the centre of the first floor, at 10.13 a. m., and an alarm was sent. The flames travelled with such rapidity that they had already spread to the seven other buildings when Chief Janies Ross arrived. He had three American-La France motor pumping engines, one motor driven Mott steam engine, two Seagrave ladder trucks and one Knox combination chemical and hose wagon in service and had seven engine streams and two hydrant streams on the fire. Four double hydrants on a six-inch water main were available; the average hydrant pressure being 60 pounds. The department had in use 3,450 feet of hose of which six lengths burst.

No posts to display