CHANGING PUMPING SYSTEM FROM TANK TO DIRECT PRESSURE SYSTEM

CHANGING PUMPING SYSTEM FROM TANK TO DIRECT PRESSURE SYSTEM

Method to Overcome Disadvantage of Failure of Pressure in Water Mains—Use of Auxiliary Pump

IN most water works of less than five million gallons daily consumption there is rarely more than one pump in service at the same time. Should this pump stop for any cause, there would be a lack of pressure in the system. In order to prevent the development of a serious situation in the water supply problem, it becomes necessary to guard against this,

Method of Altering Pump to Operate Reserve Pump

I had reason several years ago to convert a tank pressure system into a direct pressure pumping system. We had a high duty pumping engine in daily service to maintain the pressure in the system; should this pump stop for any cause, the city would be out of water. To guard against this we equipped an auxiliary pump with a pump governor placing the governor in the steam line ahead of the throttle valve. We connected this governor’s pressure cylinder with the city mains by means of a ka-inch pipe and set the governor seven pounds below the pressure we maintained in the city mains. We also equipped the suction pipe with a foot valve at the source of supply and connected the suction pipe to the city mains with a ka-inch pipe. This was to insure that the suction pipe was full of water at all times and free from air pockets so that when the pump started, there would he no shock or jar.

This pump has been equipped this way for several years and has never failed to cut in and maintain the pressure when needed. This pump stands under full steam pressure at all times and from outward appearance, there is nothing to indicate that there is any leakage of steam. At the proper moment the pump starts operating and maintains the pressure.

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