CHAPMAN YARD HYDRANTS.

CHAPMAN YARD HYDRANTS.

These hydrants are especially designed to meet the requirements of service in railway yards for washing cars and filling water tanks; for waterworks service where a number of families obtain their water from one source of supply; for stables, carriage houses, stockyards, street washing, and lawn sprinkling—in fact, for any service where it is important to have a water supply that shuts off below the frost line. They are also self-draining to prevent freezing. These hydrants are of extra strong design in all working parts,and are made with the Chapman automatic dripvalve at the bottom of the post. This drip-valve is operated by means of a bronze rod extending to the top of the hydrant, where the operating screw and handwheel are located as in Figure 1, or they can be made to open by a lever and be self closing, as in Figure 2In ordering these hydrants for use in New England or similar climate, where the frost line extends four and one-half feet below the surface, they usually furnished are six feet long from the centre of the inlet pipe to the centre of the outlet pipe ; where the frost line does not run so low, they can be made shorter. If for colder climates, they can be made longer to meet conditions. In setting these hydrants, it is the ordinary practice to set them so that the outlet is about eighteen inches above the ground.

CHAPMAN YARD HYDRANT, FIG. I.CHAPMAN YARD HYDRANT, FIG. 2

The students of the Northwestern University of Chicago, who formed a bucket brigade during the recent fire in the dormitory, have organised themselves into a fire brigade, with H. E. Russell as leader.

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