Charcoal Factory Fire in New York.

Charcoal Factory Fire in New York.

Manhattan borough allowed seventy-five days to pass over without a 3-alarm fire. It came, however, in the shape of a blaze in the hay-mow of a stable occupied by a contractor, and running from West Twenty-fourth to West Twenty-fifth streets, west of Tenth avenue and just outside of the northern limit of the new high-pressure water system, intended as an auxiliary to the fire department. The district is a very congested one and abounds in factories small and great, all in the immediate neighborhood of the scene of the fire, which at first was a threatening one, but not more so than many others in the same locality have been. It was one that called merely for ordinary engine and possibly watertower work. It afforded a good opportunity, however, to test the capabilities of the new high-pressure system. It was fully expected that the force of the stream (the pressure being 100 lb.) thrown would have drowned out the flames at once in the sixth story, where the fire started. Instead of that, however, the flames communicated to Xewmann’s charcoal factory. The hose had been connected with the high-pressure hydrants, and the watertower was set immediately in front of the burning stable. The pressure burst the new hose, and the stream thrown completed the work that had been begun by the steam fire engines and the watertower. The loss was $60,000, and the general feeling among the firemen was that it would not have been any more, if the high-pressure system had not been resorted to. Contrary to the report that appeared in all the daily papers of the city, no recourse was had to salt water, only Croton water was used.

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