CHEAP NOTORIETY.

CHEAP NOTORIETY.

How easy it is to obtain cheap advertising is shown by an item that appeared in several daily papers anent the supremacy of American goods over those furnished by English manufacturers, on account of an insignificant order being placed in this country for small electrical appliances for installing a fire alarm service in Windsor Castle, England. The real facts of the case are these: A London firm received acontract for putting in a regular domicile electric fire alarm system in that royal residence. The boxes, wire, and special appliances for such work can be obtained at any electrical supply house in almost any large city in this country or in European countries. From the fact, however, that through American ingenuity and machinery, goods of this kind can be made here and imported at a lower price than they can bepurchaeed in England, the London firm in question decided to order from us. A Connecticut firm, which makes a cheap line of electrical goods, received an order for small bells and boxes, while t he (iamewell Fire Alarm company, of New York, was asked to furnish its special instruments, and another New York firm was patronized to a small extent to complete the order. There was no comiietition for the work on this side of the Atlantic, whatever there may have been In London, so the orders were distributed by the contractors as stated above. Of course, the fact that Her Majesty’s principal home was to Is* equipjwd with American goods, led the Connecticut firm to derive ns much newspaper notoriety and free advertising as possible; and that it succeeded is very much to its credit as a clever stroke of business. The amusing part of the story is, that those who bad orders for the expensive patented instruments to l>e used in the installation, were not referred to at all in the newspaper paragraph, and the amount of the order was not stated as being in the aggregate not more than $2,000.

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