CHIEF DEASY RESIGNS.

CHIEF DEASY RESIGNS.

Some time ago Chief Thomas Deasy, of Victoria, B. C., one of the best known and most efficient fire chiefs on the Pacific slope, tendered his resignation to the city council, but withdrew it temporarily till the fire commissioners had conducted an inquiry into the matters which had caused him to take such a step. Three months since Chief Deasy made certain recommendations to the mayor and fire wardens of the city for the better government of the fire department. The call officers took offence, and in what Chief Deasy in his letter of resignation calls a “spirit of insubordination circulated a petition amongst the men, calling into question the actions of the persons appointed over them, and, withont consulting them and asking for a consideration of their alleged grievance, induced a number of the firemen to sign said petition, and submitted it to the board. Despite the law and rules, and without demanding an explanation of our conduct, certain members of the board of aldermen immediately deckled on an investigation. This took place three months ago. Since that time certain officers and men went round amongst the aldermen and recited their stories and were listened to; in fact,notes were made and questions asked me of petty affairs that have taken place in the fire department outside of the question at issue. The scope, of the investigation went so far as to bring into the matter private conversation, and matters altogether foreign to the question at issue.” In consequence, Chief Deasy tendered his resignation, but recalled it, pending an inquiry. This inquiry dragged ou, and as the chief’s recommendation with respect to the appointment of an assistant chief from the ranks of the permanent men, and not those of the call men, continued to be ignored, he resigned, and his resignation was accepted by the aldermen. The fire wardens, however, were unwilling to lose Chief Deasy, but were overruled. In reporting to the city council they here the following deservedly high testimony to his efficiency as a fireman: “We cannot refrain from expressing our regret that Mr. Deasy has felt it incumbent upon him to take this step. The city loses by he retirement of Mr. Deasy the services of an honest, sober, capable man, an excellent disciplinarian, and to whose ability and watchful care we are firmly convinced the city has to a great extent been indebted for its immunity from disastrous fires during the last fourteen years. The council will be fortunate if it secures as good a man as his successor.”

CHIEF DEASY.

Chief Deasy is a valued member of the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Engineers, of which hotly he was president last year, and has always been foremost in every endeavor to improve the fire service both in his own city and on the Pacific slope. He made fire protection a life study and is looked upon by firemen in general as an expert in that line. His loss is a serious blow to the fire department of Victoria, which, although a mixed permanent and call force, he had brought to a state of very high efficiency. Who his successor will be is not yet known. As the fire wardens remark in their letter to the city council, that body will be “fortunate if it secures as good a man as his successor.” It may he added that Chief Deasy has done much to enrich fire service literature and has contributed several valuable papers to FIRE AND WATER, although he was often too modest to sign his name to his articles.

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