CHIEF GEORGE W. HORTON.

CHIEF GEORGE W. HORTON.

While there may be many firemen, chief engineers or others who have rounded out their fortyfive or fifty years, or even more of actual service, it may safely be said that none can be more highly respected or esteemed by his department and his fellow citizens than George W. Horton, chief engineer of the fire department of Baltimore, Md., who has just kept his forty-fifth anniversary as a fireman. In token of the kindly feeling entertained towards him, not only by his own people (whose warm regard for him contradicts the proverb that a prophet has no honor in his own country), testimony showing this came pouring in to him from all quarters. Captain John J. Cashman, of the Brooklyn, New York, salvage corps, sent a letter of congratulation. The salvage corps of his own city brought him gifts. From Philadelphia and elsewhere came letters, presents and congratulations. His own officers sent him a splendid bouquet of forty-five roses. Flowers were also sent and a handsome framed picture of No. 6 firehouse—the latest addition to the fire stations of his own city. These and many similar manifestations of esteem all witnessed to the fine estimation in which Chief Horton is held by his fellow citizens, their sense of the faithful and conscientious (if unostentatious) way in which he fulfils the responsibilities of his important position and the confidence they repose in him as the skilled and faithful guardian of their lives and property. It is needless to say that the chief fel more than gratified by the demonstration in honor of his anniversary, and equally needless to observe that it was fully deserved—if at least his career as a fireman is to be taken as a criterion of excellence. There is no necessity for lauding him either on paper or by word of mouth. His works praise him in the gate. Baltimore is to be congratulated on its fire chief and its fire department, which is what it is because he made it so. Already his jubilee is being looked forward to—and then the celebration of yesterday will “hide its diminished head.” K.

BALTIMORE, MO., March 3, 1907.

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