CHIEF JOHNSON, OF PHILADELPHIA.

CHIEF JOHNSON, OF PHILADELPHIA.

No friend of a well-regulated paid Fire Department can fail to admire the high moral tone, the conservative philosophy, and the beautiful sentiments—especially the sentiments—of the three Fire Commissioners, who, in their report, tell Chief Engineer Johnson that if he desires to be happy he must make it a point to be virtuous, and—keep out of nomiaating convention ricts hereafter. And then the severe simplicity of the languaage, and the judicial impartiality of the manner in which they censure the “most disgraceful scene” enacted at the Recorder of Deeds convention show the touches of a master hand. That “scene,” if it has any penetrable feeling at all, must feel very bad when it hears of this report. The “ scene” appears to have enacted itseff, as far as the unaided mental vision can discern from this n port. That there were men there—and men in blue flannel—the Commissioners do not deny, but whether they were firemen or not ” does not appear.” H iw frank ar.d beautiful is all this! Chief Johnson was there, too, and some say he was “ uproarious,” while others declare he was the mildest-mannered gentleman present. Some allow he did, and some allow he didn’t. This bothers the three Commissioners so that they ask in gentle tones, “ Why was he there at all ? ” Ah, why indeed ? And then the Commissioners tell him he is reprimanded, and if he ever goes there again his “ connexion ” will be “ severed.” Dreadful fate!

Nothing can be more admirable. The report should be indelibly printed on sheets of three-ply catbolized hose, posted up in all the Fire Stations, with reserve copies to be dilivered just after the next delegate elections. The satisfaction of the public with the report must afford ample compensation for the time spent by the Commissioners in its evolution. The delay of its publication has been attributed to the infrequency with which the Commissioners meet each other, so that it has taken about three months to get their signatures—even that would only be one month for each of the three Commissioners to sign. This is s mistake, however, the real cause of delay, we feel persuaded, must have been because no Hcok and Ladder Truck in the Department had a Ladder long enough to enable the Commisioners to ascend to the lofty plane of moral tone, high philosophy and exalted sentiment that makes the report so luminous. II they ever got there, even after a three months’ effort, must be left fora more intelligent future to determine.—Phil. Ledger.

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