Chief Price Saves Wheat Elevator

Chief Price Saves Wheat Elevator

Chief W. R. Price and thirty-seven members of the Springfield, Mo., fire department made a hard and successful fight to save an elevator containing 15,000 bushels of wheat when fire recently occurred at Links’ Mills in that city. The plant was of wood and brick and corrugated iron construction, and the buildings were two and three stories in height, and the fire started in the shipping department at 6.30 a. m., the cause being spontaneous combustion. There was no watchman and the blaze was discovered by the engineer in an electric power plant half a block away. An alarm was sent in by telephone and Chief Price, who responded with an AmericanLaFrance motor pumping engine and two steamers, found the interior of the packing shed, built of wood and corrugated iron, was all afire. There were six hydrants available, these being situated 500 feet apart, and there being a hydrant pressure of 50 pounds, water being furnished by 16 and 8-inch mains, and supplied from a standpipe; 3,000 feet of hose were in service and Chief Price had six engine streams on the burning premises. Two turrets were used. It required six hours’ work to extinguish the flames, which were stopped in the mill, and not only were the flames prevented from spreading to the wheat elevator, but the damage to the mill property was kept down to $20,000 on buildings valued at $50,000 and $8,000 on contents valued at $9,000. The contents consisted of machinery.

The Fire at Links’ Mills, Springfield, Mo., at Its Height.

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