Chief Stetson Checks Spread of Seattle Factory Fire

Chief Stetson Checks Spread of Seattle Factory Fire

Thin siding between buildings and thin glass windows were instrumental in the spread of a fire which caused a damage of nearly $50,000 in Seattle, Wash., recently and would have caused considerable more had it not been for the effective work of Chief F. L. Stetson and his department. Three buildings were damaged, occupied respectively by the Beardsley Graham Show Case Factory, the Metropolitan Laundry and the Puget Sound Art Glass Company. Located in the north central section of the city, the two first named occupied lots 60 feet by 120 feet and the last, a lot 30 feet by 70 feet, facing on a thoroughfare 66 feet wide. The buildings were from 12 to 18 years old, of frame and had few partition walls. The fire started in the back part of the show case factory from an unknown cause, and rapidly spread to adjoining buildings to the leeward until it reached the end of the row after burning an hour.

Two alarms were turned in. One by a laundry watchman who discovered the fire at 11.34 p. m., and another by Acting Battalion Chief William Carmichael who realized the force of the fire. There were fire extinguishers kept on the premises. When the firemen arrived in response tothe first alarm they found the rear of the first building already a mass of flames which were spreading rapidly. Four steam engines, one American-La France motor pumping engine and hose car, one Seagrave motor pump and hose car, eight hose wagons and two trucks were used in fighting the fire. There were five 6-inch hydrants, one with 4-inch outlet and two with 2 1/2-inch outlets, with a water pressure of about 95 pounds available. There were 5,300 feet of 2 1/2-inch hose, 550 feet of 3-inch hose and 200 feet of 1-inch hose used (of which 1 length broke), making a total of 6,050 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose, with 1 1/8 and l 1/4-inch nozzles utilized. Water was fed by gravity system through 6-inch and 8-inch mains. The burned buildings were given over to a wood-working plant, a laundry and a concern engaged in the manufacture of ornamental glass, and before the fire were valued at $24,907.77, and their contents at $50,598.23. The loss on the buildings is estimated at $10,771.26 and on the contents at $35,032.73.

Front View of Scene of Fire at Metropolitan Laundry Plant at Seattle, Wash.

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