CHLORINATION AND HEALTH OF COMMUNITIES

CHLORINATION AND HEALTH OF COMMUNITIES

An Interesting Chart Showing the Relation of the Chlorination of Water Supplies to the Lessening of Typhoid Caused by Pollution

ANYTHING that affects the health of a city or town is of the utmost importance, not only to that community, but also to those that surround it. and in a lesser degree, but still worthy of consideration, to the country at large. This is especially true in the case of contagious and infectious diseases, and anything which lessens the liability of the start or spread of such sicknesses should have the immediate attention of the authorities responsible for the health of the people. That this fact is pretty generally recognized is shown by the accompanying chart, which illustrates the growing use of liquid chlorine as a treatment for water supplies, and the consequent decrease in the death rate from that disease which is largely due to the use of polluted waters— typhoid fever.

As will he seen by referring to the chart, previous to 1918 the use of liquid chlorine was wholly unknown, and the death rate from typhoid was in 1907—30,000 or 30.3 per 100,000. Consequent to the rise in the use of the chemical, the decrease in this death rate has been steady, until it will be seen that the rate in 1918, when 2,500 water supplies were chlorinated, and three and a half billion gallons of water treated daily, had dropped to 13,000; 12.3 per 100,000. The result of this can hardly be overestimated. Not only does it mean that 17,000 lives were saved in one year, but also it speaks for the general improvement in the health and accordingly the efficiency of many thousands of others who, even if they had escaped death by the dreaded disease, would have been left invalids or semi-invalids for the remainder of their lives. This chart is reproduced through the courtesy of the Electro Bleaching Gas Company, New York.

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