Cigarette Causes Worcester Fire

Cigarette Causes Worcester Fire

A cigarette is believed to have caused a recent fire in the John E. Day estate building in Worcester, Mass., giving the fire department, commanded by Chief W. N. Avery, an eight hours’ fight. The building, 5 stories in height, was constructed of brick, and had partition walls, but the fire doors were not closed. The flames, which started at a stairway, spread with rapidity and were burning furiously when Chief Avery responded to a telegraph alarm at 8:54 p. m. He had eighty firemen, one American-LaFrance steam engine, ten hose wagons and three ladder trucks and 6,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose in service, three engine streams and seven hydrant streams being directed on the blaze. The contents of the building was wall paper and smoke helmets were used. By able handling of the situation, Chief Avery stopped the fire on the fourth floor. Water was obtained from a 16-inch main and eight or ten hydrants were available, the pressure at the hydrants being 100 to 140 pounds.

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