Cleveland’s New High Pressure System

Cleveland’s New High Pressure System

The new high pressure pumping station at Cleveland, O., now nearly completed, will be entirely fireproof, inside and out. Even the desk in the operator’s room is metal, everything proof against flames save the wooden chairs. But to further insure the building from possible fires in the vicinity, the building is protected on all four sides by a “fire curtain.” The plant is equipped with four centrifugal pumps, with floor space for two more. These pumps are electrically driven and have a capacity of 2,500 gallons per minute each, the whole plant having a producing capacity of 10,000 gallons per minute; but the pumps have under test produced 16,000 gallons under a 300-pound pressure. All water is metered into the station and metered out, the Venturi meter system (all gauges regulated by mercury) having been installed at a cost of $25,000. These meters show both pressure and amount. The entire plant is operated by electricity. Every valve is opened and shut by electricity, signals are flashed, everything will be assured all of the correctness of detail and absolute accuracy that can be secured only through mechanical power. Twenty motors are employed for various purposes in the station. The plant will be electrically ventilated. The foul air is carried to the top of the building where a space has been left between the roof and the ceiling, and then blown out by a fan system This system of ventilation with the water curtain which, when in operation, creates a considerable breeze and cools the atmosphere very perceptibly. Every hydrant in the high pressure service district has four outlets, with a regulating valve on every outlet which are set to deliver water from 50 to 300 pounds pressure as desired by the operator. One hydrant can produce several streams of water from each outlet. Near the hydrants in the high pressure districts are signal boxes by means of which the commanding officer at a fire can communicate with the operator in the pumping station, and he in his turn send in instructions to the man at the switchboard in the engine room without leaving his post. This is done by means of a lever system which tells whether the engineer is to get ready to go ahead, to throw on 100 pounds pressure. 200 or the amount desired. The system of signals was suggested by the system in use for marine purposes, and operates by means of bells very much in the same fashion.

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